The Warmth of Other Suns

The Warmth of Other Suns
  • Author : Isabel Wilkerson
  • Publisher : Vintage
  • Pages : 622
  • Relase : 2010
  • ISBN : 9780679763888

The Warmth of Other Suns Book Review:

Presents an epic history that covers the period from the end of World War I through the 1970s, chronicling the decades-long migration of African Americans from the South to the North and West through the stories of three individuals and their families.

The Warmth of Other Suns

The Warmth of Other Suns
  • Author : Isabel Wilkerson
  • Publisher : Random House
  • Pages : 640
  • Relase : 2010-09-07
  • ISBN : 9780679444329

The Warmth of Other Suns Book Review:

NATIONAL BEST SELLER • NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD WINNER • NAMED ONE OF TIME’S TEN BEST NONFICTION BOOKS OF THE DECADE AND ONE OF BUZZFEED’S BEST BOOKS OF THE DECADE “A brilliant and stirring epic . . . Ms. Wilkerson does for the Great Migration what John Steinbeck did for the Okies in his fiction masterpiece, The Grapes of Wrath; she humanizes history, giving it emotional and psychological depth.”—John Stauffer, The Wall Street Journal NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times •USA Today • O: The Oprah Magazine • Publishers Weekly • Salon • Newsday •The Daily Beast In this beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize–winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life. From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America. Wilkerson compares this epic migration to the migrations of other peoples in history. She interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to new data and official records, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves. With stunning historical detail, Wilkerson tells this story through the lives of three unique individuals: Ida Mae Gladney, who in 1937 left sharecropping and prejudice in Mississippi for Chicago, where she achieved quiet blue-collar success and, in old age, voted for Barack Obama when he ran for an Illinois Senate seat; sharp and quick-tempered George Starling, who in 1945 fled Florida for Harlem, where he endangered his job fighting for civil rights, saw his family fall, and finally found peace in God; and Robert Foster, who left Louisiana in 1953 to pursue a medical career, the personal physician to Ray Charles as part of a glitteringly successful medical career, which allowed him to purchase a grand home where he often threw exuberant parties. Wilkerson brilliantly captures their first treacherous and exhausting cross-country trips by car and train and their new lives in colonies that grew into ghettos, as well as how they changed these cities with southern food, faith, and culture and improved them with discipline, drive, and hard work. Both a riveting microcosm and a major assessment, The Warmth of Other Suns is a bold, remarkable, and riveting work, a superb account of an “unrecognized immigration” within our own land. Through the breadth of its narrative, the beauty of the writing, the depth of its research, and the fullness of the people and lives portrayed herein, this book is destined to become a classic. NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New Yorker • The Washington Post • The Economist • Boston Globe • San Francisco Chronicle • Chicago Tribune • Entertainment Weekly • Philadelphia Inquirer • The Guardian • The Seattle Times • St. Louis Post-Dispatch • The Christian Science Monitor

The Warmth of Other Suns

The Warmth of Other Suns
  • Author : Isabel Wilkerson
  • Publisher : Vintage
  • Pages : 640
  • Relase : 2010-09-07
  • ISBN : 9780679604075

The Warmth of Other Suns Book Review:

NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD WINNER • NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • In this beautifully written masterwork, the Pulitzer Prize–winnner and bestselling author of Caste chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life. From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America. Wilkerson compares this epic migration to the migrations of other peoples in history. She interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to new data and official records, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves. With stunning historical detail, Wilkerson tells this story through the lives of three unique individuals: Ida Mae Gladney, who in 1937 left sharecropping and prejudice in Mississippi for Chicago, where she achieved quiet blue-collar success and, in old age, voted for Barack Obama when he ran for an Illinois Senate seat; sharp and quick-tempered George Starling, who in 1945 fled Florida for Harlem, where he endangered his job fighting for civil rights, saw his family fall, and finally found peace in God; and Robert Foster, who left Louisiana in 1953 to pursue a medical career, the personal physician to Ray Charles as part of a glitteringly successful medical career, which allowed him to purchase a grand home where he often threw exuberant parties. Wilkerson brilliantly captures their first treacherous and exhausting cross-country trips by car and train and their new lives in colonies that grew into ghettos, as well as how they changed these cities with southern food, faith, and culture and improved them with discipline, drive, and hard work. Both a riveting microcosm and a major assessment, The Warmth of Other Suns is a bold, remarkable, and riveting work, a superb account of an “unrecognized immigration” within our own land. Through the breadth of its narrative, the beauty of the writing, the depth of its research, and the fullness of the people and lives portrayed herein, this book is destined to become a classic.

Caste (Oprah's Book Club)

Caste (Oprah's Book Club)
  • Author : Isabel Wilkerson
  • Publisher : Random House
  • Pages : 496
  • Relase : 2020-08-04
  • ISBN : 9780593230251

Caste (Oprah's Book Club) Book Review:

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • OPRAH’S BOOK CLUB PICK • NATIONAL BOOK AWARD LONGLIST • “An instant American classic and almost certainly the keynote nonfiction book of the American century thus far.”—Dwight Garner, The New York Times The Pulitzer Prize–winning, bestselling author of The Warmth of Other Suns examines the unspoken caste system that has shaped America and shows how our lives today are still defined by a hierarchy of human divisions. NAMED THE #1 NONFICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR BY TIME, ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY People • The Washington Post • Publishers Weekly AND ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review • O: The Oprah Magazine • NPR • Bloomberg • Christian Science Monitor • New York Post • The New York Public Library • Fortune • Smithsonian Magazine • Marie Claire • Town & Country • Slate • Library Journal • Kirkus Reviews • LibraryReads • PopMatters Winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize • National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist • Dayton Literary Peace Prize Finalist • PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction Finalist • PEN/Jean Stein Book Award Longlist “As we go about our daily lives, caste is the wordless usher in a darkened theater, flashlight cast down in the aisles, guiding us to our assigned seats for a performance. The hierarchy of caste is not about feelings or morality. It is about power—which groups have it and which do not.” In this brilliant book, Isabel Wilkerson gives us a masterful portrait of an unseen phenomenon in America as she explores, through an immersive, deeply researched narrative and stories about real people, how America today and throughout its history has been shaped by a hidden caste system, a rigid hierarchy of human rankings. Beyond race, class, or other factors, there is a powerful caste system that influences people’s lives and behavior and the nation’s fate. Linking the caste systems of America, India, and Nazi Germany, Wilkerson explores eight pillars that underlie caste systems across civilizations, including divine will, bloodlines, stigma, and more. Using riveting stories about people—including Martin Luther King, Jr., baseball’s Satchel Paige, a single father and his toddler son, Wilkerson herself, and many others—she shows the ways that the insidious undertow of caste is experienced every day. She documents how the Nazis studied the racial systems in America to plan their out-cast of the Jews; she discusses why the cruel logic of caste requires that there be a bottom rung for those in the middle to measure themselves against; she writes about the surprising health costs of caste, in depression and life expectancy, and the effects of this hierarchy on our culture and politics. Finally, she points forward to ways America can move beyond the artificial and destructive separations of human divisions, toward hope in our common humanity. Beautifully written, original, and revealing, Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents is an eye-opening story of people and history, and a reexamination of what lies under the surface of ordinary lives and of American life today.

God Shakes Creation

God Shakes Creation
  • Author : David Lewis Cohn
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 348
  • Relase : 1935
  • ISBN : UCAL:$B60467

God Shakes Creation Book Review:

Summary of The Warmth of Other Suns

Summary of The Warmth of Other Suns
  • Author : Readtrepreneur Publishing
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 98
  • Relase : 2019-05-24
  • ISBN : 1646152212

Summary of The Warmth of Other Suns Book Review:

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson - Book Summary - Readtrepreneur (Disclaimer: This is NOT the original book, but an unofficial summary.) This book is an untold story of the hardships black citizens had to endure in the last century and how they managed to look for a better life fleeing from their hometowns. The Warmth of Other Suns tells us the story through the eyes of three black citizens who had to overcome a lot of hardships to be where they are now today. In a society filled with racism, they fled to the north to look for better opportunities. (Note: This summary is wholly written and published by Readtrepreneur. It is not affiliated with the original author in any way) "The general laws of migration hold that the greater the obstacles and the farther the distance traveled, the more ambitious the migrants." - Isabel Wilkerson With a Pulitzer Prize under her belt, Isabel Wilkerson does an outstanding job of narrating us the story of America's Great Migration without leaving anything important behind. A truly informative, non-fiction book that will really leave you thinking about the struggles many black men and women had to face in those days. Isabel Wilkerson captivating narrative, enthralling concept and extensive research makes this title an A plus. P.S. The Warmth of Other Suns is an extremely informative book that will also keep you hooked. The Time for Thinking is Over! Time for Action! Scroll Up Now and Click on the "Buy now with 1-Click" Button to Grab your Copy Right Away! Why Choose Us, Readtrepreneur? ● Highest Quality Summaries ● Delivers Amazing Knowledge ● Awesome Refresher ● Clear And Concise Disclaimer Once Again: This book is meant for a great companionship of the original book or to simply get the gist of the original book.

The Twelve Tribes of Hattie (Oprah's Book Club 2.0 Digital Edition)

The Twelve Tribes of Hattie (Oprah's Book Club 2.0 Digital Edition)
  • Author : Ayana Mathis
  • Publisher : Vintage
  • Pages : 256
  • Relase : 2012-12-06
  • ISBN : 9780385350297

The Twelve Tribes of Hattie (Oprah's Book Club 2.0 Digital Edition) Book Review:

The newest Oprah’s Book Club 2.0 selection: this special eBook edition of The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis features exclusive content, including Oprah’s personal notes highlighted within the text, and a reading group guide. The arrival of a major new voice in contemporary fiction. A debut of extraordinary distinction: Ayana Mathis tells the story of the children of the Great Migration through the trials of one unforgettable family. In 1923, fifteen-year-old Hattie Shepherd flees Georgia and settles in Philadelphia, hoping for a chance at a better life. Instead, she marries a man who will bring her nothing but disappointment and watches helplessly as her firstborn twins succumb to an illness a few pennies could have prevented. Hattie gives birth to nine more children whom she raises with grit and mettle and not an ounce of the tenderness they crave. She vows to prepare them for the calamitous difficulty they are sure to face in their later lives, to meet a world that will not love them, a world that will not be kind. Captured here in twelve luminous narrative threads, their lives tell the story of a mother’s monumental courage and the journey of a nation. Beautiful and devastating, Ayana Mathis’s The Twelve Tribes of Hattie is wondrous from first to last—glorious, harrowing, unexpectedly uplifting, and blazing with life. An emotionally transfixing page-turner, a searing portrait of striving in the face of insurmountable adversity, an indelible encounter with the resilience of the human spirit and the driving force of the American dream.

American Hunger

American Hunger
  • Author : Richard Wright
  • Publisher : Harper Collins
  • Pages : 160
  • Relase : 2010-11-30
  • ISBN : 9780062041500

American Hunger Book Review:

The compelling continuation of Richard Wright's great autobiographical work, Black Boy Anyone who has read Richard Wright's Black Boy knows it to be one of the great American autobiographies. Covering Wright's early life in the South, the book concludes with his departure in 1934 for a new life in the North. American Hunger (first published more than thirty years after the appearance of Black Boy) is the continuation of that story. A vital, richly anecdotal work, American Hunger treats with feeling and often with wry humor Wright's struggle to make his way in the North—in Chicago—as a store clerk, dishwasher, and eventually as a writer. He deals movingly with his early days in the Communist Party and with his attempts to keep his integrity in the face of Party demands that he subordinate his artistic goals to its needs. And he recounts with a mixture of pain and irony his break with the Party and the tortured period of ostracism that followed. There is an unsettling and totally frank personal story here, and a lot of raw social history as well.

The Sun Does Shine

The Sun Does Shine
  • Author : Anthony Ray Hinton,Lara Love Hardin
  • Publisher : St. Martin's Press
  • Pages : 272
  • Relase : 2018-03-27
  • ISBN : 9781250124722

The Sun Does Shine Book Review:

Oprah's Book Club Summer 2018 Selection The Instant New York Times Bestseller A powerful, revealing story of hope, love, justice, and the power of reading by a man who spent thirty years on death row for a crime he didn't commit. “An amazing and heartwarming story, it restores our faith in the inherent goodness of humanity.” —Archbishop Desmond Tutu In 1985, Anthony Ray Hinton was arrested and charged with two counts of capital murder in Alabama. Stunned, confused, and only twenty–nine years old, Hinton knew that it was a case of mistaken identity and believed that the truth would prove his innocence and ultimately set him free. But with no money and a different system of justice for a poor black man in the South, Hinton was sentenced to death by electrocution. He spent his first three years on Death Row at Holman State Prison in agonizing silence—full of despair and anger toward all those who had sent an innocent man to his death. But as Hinton realized and accepted his fate, he resolved not only to survive, but find a way to live on Death Row. For the next twenty–seven years he was a beacon—transforming not only his own spirit, but those of his fellow inmates, fifty–four of whom were executed mere feet from his cell. With the help of civil rights attorney and bestselling author of Just Mercy, Bryan Stevenson, Hinton won his release in 2015. With a foreword by Stevenson, The Sun Does Shine is an extraordinary testament to the power of hope sustained through the darkest times. Destined to be a classic memoir of wrongful imprisonment and freedom won, Hinton’s memoir tells his dramatic thirty–year journey and shows how you can take away a man’s freedom, but you can’t take away his imagination, humor, or joy.

The Devil You Know

The Devil You Know
  • Author : Charles M. Blow
  • Publisher : HarperCollins
  • Pages : 256
  • Relase : 2021-01-26
  • ISBN : 9780062914682

The Devil You Know Book Review:

INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A New York Times Editor’s Choice | A Kirkus Best Nonfiction Book of the Year From journalist and New York Times bestselling author Charles Blow comes a powerful manifesto and call to action, "a must-read in the effort to dismantle deep-seated poisons of systemic racism and white supremacy" (San Francisco Chronicle). Race, as we have come to understand it, is a fiction; but, racism, as we have come to live it, is a fact. The point here is not to impose a new racial hierarchy, but to remove an existing one. After centuries of waiting for white majorities to overturn white supremacy, it seems to me that it has fallen to Black people to do it themselves. Acclaimed columnist and author Charles Blow never wanted to write a “race book.” But as violence against Black people—both physical and psychological—seemed only to increase in recent years, culminating in the historic pandemic and protests of the summer of 2020, he felt compelled to write a new story for Black Americans. He envisioned a succinct, counterintuitive, and impassioned corrective to the myths that have for too long governed our thinking about race and geography in America. Drawing on both political observations and personal experience as a Black son of the South, Charles set out to offer a call to action by which Black people can finally achieve equality, on their own terms. So what will it take to make lasting change when small steps have so frequently failed? It’s going to take an unprecedented shift in power. The Devil You Know is a groundbreaking manifesto, proposing nothing short of the most audacious power play by Black people in the history of this country. This book is a grand exhortation to generations of a people, offering a road map to true and lasting freedom.

Applied Theatre: Economies

Applied Theatre: Economies
  • Author : Molly Mullen
  • Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing
  • Pages : 280
  • Relase : 2018-09-06
  • ISBN : 9781350001725

Applied Theatre: Economies Book Review:

The APPLIED THEATRE series is a major innovation in applied theatre scholarship: each book presents new ways of seeing and critically reflecting on this dynamic and vibrant field. Volumes offer a theoretical framework and introductory survey of the field addressed, combined with a range of case studies illustrating and critically engaging with practice. Series Editors: Sheila Preston and Michael Balfour Applied Theatre: Economies addresses a notoriously problematic area: applied theatre's relationship to the economy and the ways in which socially committed theatre makers fund, finance or otherwise resource their work. Part One addresses longstanding concerns in the field about the effects of economic conditions and funding relationships on applied theatre practice. It considers how applied theatre's relationship with local and global economies can be understood from different theoretical and philosophical perspectives. It also examines a range of ways in which applied theatre can be resourced, identifying key issues and seeking possibilities for theatre makers to sustain their work without undermining their social and artistic values. The international case studies in Part Two give vivid insights into the day-to-day challenges of resourcing applied theatre work in Chile, Canada, the UK, New Zealand, Hong Kong and the US. The authors examine critical issues or points of tension that have arisen in a particular funding relationship or from specific economic activities. Each study also illuminates ways in which applied theatre makers can bring artistic and social justice principles to bear on financial and organizational processes.

The Red Parts

The Red Parts
  • Author : Maggie Nelson
  • Publisher : Graywolf Press
  • Pages : 224
  • Relase : 2016-04-05
  • ISBN : 9781555979287

The Red Parts Book Review:

Late in 2004, Maggie Nelson was looking forward to the publication of her book Jane: A Murder, a narrative in verse about the life and death of her aunt, who had been murdered thirty-five years before. The case remained unsolved, but Jane was assumed to have been the victim of an infamous serial killer in Michigan in 1969. Then, one November afternoon, Nelson received a call from her mother, who announced that the case had been reopened; a new suspect would be arrested and tried on the basis of a DNA match. Over the months that followed, Nelson found herself attending the trial with her mother and reflecting anew on the aura of dread and fear that hung over her family and childhood--an aura that derived not only from the terrible facts of her aunt's murder but also from her own complicated journey through sisterhood, daughterhood, and girlhood. The Red Parts is a memoir, an account of a trial, and a provocative essay that interrogates the American obsession with violence and missing white women, and that scrupulously explores the nature of grief, justice, and empathy.

The Black Hearts of Men

The Black Hearts of Men
  • Author : John Stauffer
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Pages : 379
  • Relase : 2009-06-30
  • ISBN : 9780674043961

The Black Hearts of Men Book Review:

At a time when slavery was spreading and the country was steeped in racism, two white men and two black men overcame social barriers and mistrust to form a unique alliance that sought nothing less than the end of all evil. Drawing on the largest extant bi-racial correspondence in the Civil War era, John Stauffer braids together these men's struggles to reconcile ideals of justice with the reality of slavery and oppression. Who could imagine that Gerrit Smith, one of the richest men in the country, would give away his wealth to the poor and ally himself with Frederick Douglass, an ex-slave? And why would James McCune Smith, the most educated black man in the country, link arms with John Brown, a bankrupt entrepreneur, along with the others? Distinguished by their interracial bonds, they shared a millennialist vision of a new world where everyone was free and equal. As the nation headed toward armed conflict, these men waged their own war by establishing model interracial communities, forming a new political party, and embracing violence. Their revolutionary ethos bridged the divide between the sacred and the profane, black and white, masculine and feminine, and civilization and savagery that had long girded western culture. In so doing, it embraced a malleable and "black-hearted" self that was capable of violent revolt against a slaveholding nation, in order to usher in a kingdom of God on earth. In tracing the rise and fall of their prophetic vision and alliance, Stauffer reveals how radical reform helped propel the nation toward war even as it strove to vanquish slavery and preserve the peace.

Gardens Old & New; The Country House & Its Garden Environment;

Gardens Old & New; The Country House & Its Garden Environment;
  • Author : H. Avray Tipping
  • Publisher : Franklin Classics Trade Press
  • Pages : 336
  • Relase : 2018-11-10
  • ISBN : 0353254509

Gardens Old & New; The Country House & Its Garden Environment; Book Review:

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Slavery by Another Name

Slavery by Another Name
  • Author : Douglas A. Blackmon
  • Publisher : Icon Books
  • Pages : 496
  • Relase : 2012-10-04
  • ISBN : 9781848314139

Slavery by Another Name Book Review:

A Pulitzer Prize-winning history of the mistreatment of black Americans. In this 'precise and eloquent work' - as described in its Pulitzer Prize citation - Douglas A. Blackmon brings to light one of the most shameful chapters in American history - an 'Age of Neoslavery' that thrived in the aftermath of the Civil War through the dawn of World War II. Using a vast record of original documents and personal narratives, Blackmon unearths the lost stories of slaves and their descendants who journeyed into freedom after the Emancipation Proclamation and then back into the shadow of involuntary servitude thereafter. By turns moving, sobering and shocking, this unprecedented account reveals these stories, the companies that profited the most from neoslavery, and the insidious legacy of racism that reverberates today.

George MacDonald in the Age of Miracles

George MacDonald in the Age of Miracles
  • Author : Timothy Larsen
  • Publisher : InterVarsity Press
  • Pages : 150
  • Relase : 2018-11-20
  • ISBN : 9780830874040

George MacDonald in the Age of Miracles Book Review:

In this Hansen Lectureship volume, Timothy Larsen considers the legacy of George MacDonald, the Victorian Scottish author and minister who is best known for his pioneering fantasy literature. Larsen explores how MacDonald sought to counteract skepticism, unbelief, naturalism, and materialism and to herald instead the reality of the miraculous, the supernatural, the wondrous, and the realm of the spirit.

The Warmth of Other Suns

The Warmth of Other Suns
  • Author : The Summary Guy
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 28
  • Relase : 2017-07-15
  • ISBN : 1548940151

The Warmth of Other Suns Book Review:

The Warmth of Other Suns: A Complete Summary! The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration is a book written by Isabel Wilkerson. It is a re-telling of the Great Migration, in which more than six million African-Americans from southern America migrated to the northern and western regions of the United States.The period of the Great Migration happened between WWI and the 1970s. In this true story, we will read about the lives of Ida Mae Brandon Gladney, George Swanson Starling, and Robert Pershing Foster. All three of them migrated from southern America to different urban areas of the North at different times. Even though the three never knew each other, their goals and their reasons for moving to the North were more or less the same: they wanted to seek freedom in a shared vision of northern America and escape the crudeness and harshness of their lives in the South. Here Is A Preview of What You Will Get:- A summarized version of the book.- You will find the book analyzed to further strengthen your knowledge.- Fun multiple choice quizzes, along with answers to help you learn about the book.Get a copy, and learn everything about The Warmth of Other Suns.

The Rape of the Lock

The Rape of the Lock
  • Author : Alexander Pope
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 28
  • Relase : 1751
  • ISBN : BL:A0022528798

The Rape of the Lock Book Review:

The Great Migration

The Great Migration
  • Author : Eloise Greenfield
  • Publisher : Harper Collins
  • Pages : 32
  • Relase : 2010-12-21
  • ISBN : 9780061259210

The Great Migration Book Review:

We were one family among the many thousands. Mama and Daddy leaving home, coming to the city, with their hopes and their courage, their dreams and their children, to make a better life. When Eloise Greenfield was four months old, her family moved from their home in Parmele, North Carolina, to Washington, D.C. Before Jan Spivey Gilchrist was born, her mother moved from Arkansas and her father moved from Mississippi. Both settled in Chicago, Illinois. Though none of them knew it at the time, they had all become part of the Great Migration. In this collection of poems and collage artwork, award winners Eloise Greenfield and Jan Spivey Gilchrist gracefully depict the experiences of families like their own, who found the courage to leave their homes behind and make new lives for themselves elsewhere.

Teen Titans Go! Vol. 5: Falling Stars

Teen Titans Go! Vol. 5: Falling Stars
  • Author : Sholly Fisch
  • Publisher : DC Comics
  • Pages : 128
  • Relase : 2018-11-20
  • ISBN : 9781401287177

Teen Titans Go! Vol. 5: Falling Stars Book Review:

Gear up for the highly anticipated animated movie, Teen Titans Go! To The Movies, with TEEN TITANS GO! VOL. 5! Robin, Starfire, Beast Boy, Cyborg and Raven are back in the all-ages comic books based on the hit Cartoon Network animated series Teen Titans Go! Being a superhero is tough enough, but the team must face some everyday chores and obstacles that may prove to be too much, even for them. The Titans tackle the single most terrifying word in the English language: "dentist"! Will Robin's dental routine save him from making a dreaded trip? Then, the heroes get crafty when Raven and Cyborg create a pair of spooky-looking leggings from a pattern in one of Raven's arcane books. Robin's in for quite the fright when he tries on these "Scaredy-Pants"! Before you catch them in theaters, join the Teen Titans as they try to make it through the mundane chores and everyday hurdles that are just a little extra super for these superheroes. Collects TEEN TITANS GO! #25-30.