The Man who Loved Only Numbers

The Man who Loved Only Numbers
  • Author : Paul Hoffman
  • Publisher : Fourth Estate (GB)
  • Pages : 301
  • Relase : 1999
  • ISBN : 1857028295

The Man who Loved Only Numbers Book Review:

The biography of a mathematical genius. Paul Erdos was the most prolific pure mathematician in history and, arguably, the strangest too. 'A mathematical genius of the first order, Paul Erdos was totally obsessed with his subject -- he thought and wrote mathematics for nineteen hours a day until he died. He travelled constantly, living out of a plastic bag and had no interest in food, sex, companionship, art -- all that is usually indispensible to a human life. Paul Hoffman, in this marvellous biography, gives us a vivid and strangely moving portrait of this singular creature, one that brings out not only Erdos's genius and his oddness, but his warmth and sense of fun, the joyfulness of his strange life.' Oliver Sacks For six decades Erdos had no job, no hobbies, no wife, no home; he never learnt to cook, do laundry, drive a car and died a virgin. Instead he travelled the world with his mother in tow, arriving at the doorstep of esteemed mathematicians declaring 'My brain is open'. He travelled until his death at 83, racing across four continents to prove as many theorems as possible, fuelled by a diet of espresso and amphetamines. With more than 1,500 papers written or co-written,

The Man Who Loved Only Numbers

The Man Who Loved Only Numbers
  • Author : Paul Hoffman
  • Publisher : Hyperion
  • Pages : 336
  • Relase : 1999-05-12
  • ISBN : 0786884061

The Man Who Loved Only Numbers Book Review:

Based on a National Magazine Award-winning article, this masterful biography of Hungarian-born Paul Erdos is both a vivid portrait of an eccentric genius and a layman's guide to some of this century's most startling mathematical discoveries.

The Man who Loved Only Numbers

The Man who Loved Only Numbers
  • Author : Paul Hoffman
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 301
  • Relase : 1998
  • ISBN : 1857028112

The Man who Loved Only Numbers Book Review:

The biography of a mathematical genius. Paul Erdos was the most prolific pure mathematician in history and, arguably, the strangest too. 'A mathematical genius of the first order, Paul Erdos was totally obsessed with his subject -- he thought and wrote mathematics for nineteen hours a day until he died. He travelled constantly, living out of a plastic bag and had no interest in food, sex, companionship, art -- all that is usually indispensible to a human life. Paul Hoffman, in this marvellous biography, gives us a vivid and strangely moving portrait of this singular creature, one that brings out not only Erdos's genius and his oddness, but his warmth and sense of fun, the joyfulness of his strange life.' Oliver Sacks For six decades Erdos had no job, no hobbies, no wife, no home; he never learnt to cook, do laundry, drive a car and died a virgin. Instead he travelled the world with his mother in tow, arriving at the doorstep of esteemed mathematicians declaring 'My brain is open'. He travelled until his death at 83, racing across four continents to prove as many theorems as possible, fuelled by a diet of espresso and amphetamines. With more than 1,500 papers written or co-written,

The Man Who Loved Only Numbers

The Man Who Loved Only Numbers
  • Author : Paul Hoffman,Dr. Crypton
  • Publisher : Hyperion
  • Pages : 360
  • Relase : 1998-07-15
  • ISBN : UOM:39015047095792

The Man Who Loved Only Numbers Book Review:

Chronicles the life of the Hungarian mathematician who relentlessly traveled the globe in search of intriguing problems

The Boy Who Loved Math

The Boy Who Loved Math
  • Author : Deborah Heiligman
  • Publisher : Roaring Brook Press
  • Pages : 44
  • Relase : 2013-06-25
  • ISBN : 9781466839526

The Boy Who Loved Math Book Review:

Most people think of mathematicians as solitary, working away in isolation. And, it's true, many of them do. But Paul Erdos never followed the usual path. At the age of four, he could ask you when you were born and then calculate the number of seconds you had been alive in his head. But he didn't learn to butter his own bread until he turned twenty. Instead, he traveled around the world, from one mathematician to the next, collaborating on an astonishing number of publications. With a simple, lyrical text and richly layered illustrations, this is a beautiful introduction to the world of math and a fascinating look at the unique character traits that made "Uncle Paul" a great man. The Boy Who Loved Math by Deborah Heiligman is a Kirkus Reviews Best Book of 2013 and a New York Times Book Review Notable Children's Book of 2013.

My Brain is Open

My Brain is Open
  • Author : Bruce Schechter
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Pages : 224
  • Relase : 2000-02-28
  • ISBN : 9780684859804

My Brain is Open Book Review:

Traces the eccentric life of legendary mathematician Paul Erdos, a wandering genius who fled his native Hungary during the Holocaust and helped devise the mathematical basis of computer science.

Topics in the Theory of Numbers

Topics in the Theory of Numbers
  • Author : Janos Suranyi,Paul Erdös
  • Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
  • Pages : 287
  • Relase : 2003-01-14
  • ISBN : 0387953205

Topics in the Theory of Numbers Book Review:

Number theory, the branch of mathematics that studies the properties of the integers, is a repository of interesting and quite varied problems, sometimes impossibly difficult ones. In this book, the authors have gathered together a collection of problems from various topics in number theory that they find beautiful, intriguing, and from a certain point of view instructive.

The New York Times Book of Mathematics

The New York Times Book of Mathematics
  • Author : Gina Bari Kolata,Paul Hoffman
  • Publisher : Sterling Publishing Company Incorporated
  • Pages : 480
  • Relase : 2013
  • ISBN : 1402793227

The New York Times Book of Mathematics Book Review:

Presents a selection from the archives of the New York newspaper of its writings on mathematics from 1892 to 2010, covering such topics as chaos theory, statistics, cryptography, and computers.

The Man Who Knew Infinity

The Man Who Knew Infinity
  • Author : Robert Kanigel
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Pages : 464
  • Relase : 2016-04-26
  • ISBN : 9781476763491

The Man Who Knew Infinity Book Review:

A biography of the Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan. The book gives a detailed account of his upbringing in India, his mathematical achievements, and his mathematical collaboration with English mathematician G. H. Hardy. The book also reviews the life of Hardy and the academic culture of Cambridge University during the early twentieth century.

Zero

Zero
  • Author : Charles Seife
  • Publisher : Souvenir Press
  • Pages :
  • Relase : 2019-11-28
  • ISBN : 9781782837329

Zero Book Review:

A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK The Babylonians invented it, the Greeks banned it, the Hindus worshipped it, and the Christian Church used it to fend off heretics. Today it's a timebomb ticking in the heart of astrophysics. For zero, infinity's twin, is not like other numbers. It is both nothing and everything. Zero has pitted East against West and faith against reason, and its intransigence persists in the dark core of a black hole and the brilliant flash of the Big Bang. Today, zero lies at the heart of one of the biggest scientific controversies of all time: the quest for a theory of everything. Within the concept of zero lies a philosophical and scientific history of humanity. Charles Seife's elegant and witty account takes us from Aristotle to superstring theory by way of Egyptian geometry, Kabbalism, Einstein, the Chandrasekhar limit and Stephen Hawking. Covering centuries of thought, it is a concise tour of a world of ideas, bound up in the simple notion of nothing.

Leonhard Euler

Leonhard Euler
  • Author : Emil A. Fellmann
  • Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
  • Pages : 180
  • Relase : 2007-04-05
  • ISBN : 9783764375393

Leonhard Euler Book Review:

Euler was not only by far the most productive mathematician in the history of mankind, but also one of the greatest scholars of all time. He attained, like only a few scholars, a degree of popularity and fame which may well be compared with that of Galilei, Newton, or Einstein. Moreover he was a cosmopolitan in the truest sense of the word; he lived during his first twenty years in Basel, was active altogether for more than thirty years in Petersburg and for a quarter of a century in Berlin. Leonhard Euler’s unusually rich life and broadly diversified activity in the immediate vicinity of important personalities which have made history, may well justify an exposition. This book is based in part on unpublished sources and comes right out of the current research on Euler. It is entirely free of formulae as it has been written for a broad audience with interests in the history of culture and science.

Prime Obsession

Prime Obsession
  • Author : John Derbyshire
  • Publisher : Joseph Henry Press
  • Pages : 446
  • Relase : 2003-04-15
  • ISBN : 9780309141253

Prime Obsession Book Review:

In August 1859 Bernhard Riemann, a little-known 32-year old mathematician, presented a paper to the Berlin Academy titled: "On the Number of Prime Numbers Less Than a Given Quantity." In the middle of that paper, Riemann made an incidental remark â€" a guess, a hypothesis. What he tossed out to the assembled mathematicians that day has proven to be almost cruelly compelling to countless scholars in the ensuing years. Today, after 150 years of careful research and exhaustive study, the question remains. Is the hypothesis true or false? Riemann's basic inquiry, the primary topic of his paper, concerned a straightforward but nevertheless important matter of arithmetic â€" defining a precise formula to track and identify the occurrence of prime numbers. But it is that incidental remark â€" the Riemann Hypothesis â€" that is the truly astonishing legacy of his 1859 paper. Because Riemann was able to see beyond the pattern of the primes to discern traces of something mysterious and mathematically elegant shrouded in the shadows â€" subtle variations in the distribution of those prime numbers. Brilliant for its clarity, astounding for its potential consequences, the Hypothesis took on enormous importance in mathematics. Indeed, the successful solution to this puzzle would herald a revolution in prime number theory. Proving or disproving it became the greatest challenge of the age. It has become clear that the Riemann Hypothesis, whose resolution seems to hang tantalizingly just beyond our grasp, holds the key to a variety of scientific and mathematical investigations. The making and breaking of modern codes, which depend on the properties of the prime numbers, have roots in the Hypothesis. In a series of extraordinary developments during the 1970s, it emerged that even the physics of the atomic nucleus is connected in ways not yet fully understood to this strange conundrum. Hunting down the solution to the Riemann Hypothesis has become an obsession for many â€" the veritable "great white whale" of mathematical research. Yet despite determined efforts by generations of mathematicians, the Riemann Hypothesis defies resolution. Alternating passages of extraordinarily lucid mathematical exposition with chapters of elegantly composed biography and history, Prime Obsession is a fascinating and fluent account of an epic mathematical mystery that continues to challenge and excite the world. Posited a century and a half ago, the Riemann Hypothesis is an intellectual feast for the cognoscenti and the curious alike. Not just a story of numbers and calculations, Prime Obsession is the engrossing tale of a relentless hunt for an elusive proof â€" and those who have been consumed by it.

The Grapes of Math

The Grapes of Math
  • Author : Alex Bellos
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Pages : 352
  • Relase : 2014-06-10
  • ISBN : 9781451640120

The Grapes of Math Book Review:

From triangles, rotations and power laws, to cones, curves and the dreaded calculus, Alex takes you on a journey of mathematical discovery with his signature wit and limitless enthusiasm. He sifts through over 30,000 survey submissions to uncover the world’s favourite number, and meets a mathematician who looks for universes in his garage. He attends the World Mathematical Congress in India, and visits the engineer who designed the first roller-coaster loop. Get hooked on math as Alex delves deep into humankind’s turbulent relationship with numbers, and reveals how they have shaped the world we live in.

Sophie Germain

Sophie Germain
  • Author : Dora Musielak
  • Publisher : Springer Nature
  • Pages : 254
  • Relase : 2020-03-23
  • ISBN : 9783030383756

Sophie Germain Book Review:

This biography of the mathematician, Sophie Germain, paints a rich portrait of a brilliant and complex woman, the mathematics she developed, her associations with Gauss, Legendre, and other leading researchers, and the tumultuous times in which she lived. Sophie Germain stood right between Gauss and Legendre, and both publicly recognized her scientific efforts. Unlike her female predecessors and contemporaries, Sophie Germain was an impressive mathematician and made lasting contributions to both number theory and the theories of plate vibrations and elasticity. She was able to walk with ease across the bridge between the fields of pure mathematics and engineering physics. Though isolated and snubbed by her peers, Sophie Germain was the first woman to win the prize of mathematics from the French Academy of Sciences. She is the only woman who contributed to the proof of Fermat’s Last Theorem. In this unique biography, Dora Musielak has done the impossible―she has chronicled Sophie Germain’s brilliance through her life and work in mathematics, in a way that is simultaneously informative, comprehensive, and accurate.

Masters of Mathematics

Masters of Mathematics
  • Author : Robert A. Nowlan
  • Publisher : Springer
  • Pages : 24
  • Relase : 2017-05-13
  • ISBN : 9789463008938

Masters of Mathematics Book Review:

The original title for this work was “Mathematical Literacy, What Is It and Why You Need it”. The current title reflects that there can be no real learning in any subject, unless questions of who, what, when, where, why and how are raised in the minds of the learners. The book is not a mathematical text, and there are no assigned exercises or exams. It is written for reasonably intelligent and curious individuals, both those who value mathematics, aware of its many important applications and others who have been inappropriately exposed to mathematics, leading to indifference to the subject, fear and even loathing. These feelings are all consequences of meaningless presentations, drill, rote learning and being lost as the purpose of what is being studied. Mathematics education needs a radical reform. There is more than one way to accomplish this. Here the author presents his approach of wrapping mathematical ideas in a story. To learn one first must develop an interest in a problem and the curiosity to find how masters of mathematics have solved them. What is necessary to be mathematically literate? It’s not about solving algebraic equations or even making a geometric proof. These are valuable skills but not evidence of literacy. We often seek answers but learning to ask pertinent questions is the road to mathematical literacy. Here is the good news: new mathematical ideas have a way of finding applications. This is known as “the unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics.”

The Discrete Mathematical Charms of Paul Erd?s

The Discrete Mathematical Charms of Paul Erd?s
  • Author : Vašek Chvátal
  • Publisher : Cambridge University Press
  • Pages : 269
  • Relase : 2021-08-26
  • ISBN : 9781108831833

The Discrete Mathematical Charms of Paul Erd?s Book Review:

A captivating introduction to key results of discrete mathematics through the work of Paul Erdős, blended with first-hand reminiscences.

Recreations in the Theory of Numbers

Recreations in the Theory of Numbers
  • Author : Albert H. Beiler
  • Publisher : Courier Corporation
  • Pages : 349
  • Relase : 1964
  • ISBN : 9780486210964

Recreations in the Theory of Numbers Book Review:

Number theory proves to be a virtually inexhaustible source of intriguing puzzle problems. Includes divisors, perfect numbers, the congruences of Gauss, scales of notation, the Pell equation, more. Solutions to all problems.

Loving and Hating Mathematics

Loving and Hating Mathematics
  • Author : Reuben Hersh,Vera John-Steiner
  • Publisher : Princeton University Press
  • Pages : 432
  • Relase : 2010-12-13
  • ISBN : 1400836115

Loving and Hating Mathematics Book Review:

Mathematics is often thought of as the coldest expression of pure reason. But few subjects provoke hotter emotions--and inspire more love and hatred--than mathematics. And although math is frequently idealized as floating above the messiness of human life, its story is nothing if not human; often, it is all too human. Loving and Hating Mathematics is about the hidden human, emotional, and social forces that shape mathematics and affect the experiences of students and mathematicians. Written in a lively, accessible style, and filled with gripping stories and anecdotes, Loving and Hating Mathematics brings home the intense pleasures and pains of mathematical life. These stories challenge many myths, including the notions that mathematics is a solitary pursuit and a "young man's game," the belief that mathematicians are emotionally different from other people, and even the idea that to be a great mathematician it helps to be a little bit crazy. Reuben Hersh and Vera John-Steiner tell stories of lives in math from their very beginnings through old age, including accounts of teaching and mentoring, friendships and rivalries, love affairs and marriages, and the experiences of women and minorities in a field that has traditionally been unfriendly to both. Included here are also stories of people for whom mathematics has been an immense solace during times of crisis, war, and even imprisonment--as well as of those rare individuals driven to insanity and even murder by an obsession with math. This is a book for anyone who wants to understand why the most rational of human endeavors is at the same time one of the most emotional.

Adventures of a Mathematician

Adventures of a Mathematician
  • Author : S. M. Ulam
  • Publisher : Univ of California Press
  • Pages : 384
  • Relase : 1991
  • ISBN : 0520910559

Adventures of a Mathematician Book Review:

The true story that inspired the 2020 film. The autobiography of mathematician Stanislaw Ulam, one of the great scientific minds of the twentieth century, tells a story rich with amazingly prophetic speculations and peppered with lively anecdotes. As a member of the Los Alamos National Laboratory from 1944 on, Ulam helped to precipitate some of the most dramatic changes of the postwar world. He was among the first to use and advocate computers for scientific research, originated ideas for the nuclear propulsion of space vehicles, and made fundamental contributions to many of today's most challenging mathematical projects. With his wide-ranging interests, Ulam never emphasized the importance of his contributions to the research that resulted in the hydrogen bomb. Now Daniel Hirsch and William Mathews reveal the true story of Ulam's pivotal role in the making of the "Super," in their historical introduction to this behind-the-scenes look at the minds and ideas that ushered in the nuclear age. An epilogue by Françoise Ulam and Jan Mycielski sheds new light on Ulam's character and mathematical originality.

How Mathematicians Think

How Mathematicians Think
  • Author : William Byers
  • Publisher : Princeton University Press
  • Pages : 424
  • Relase : 2010-05-02
  • ISBN : 9780691145990

How Mathematicians Think Book Review:

To many outsiders, mathematicians appear to think like computers, grimly grinding away with a strict formal logic and moving methodically--even algorithmically--from one black-and-white deduction to another. Yet mathematicians often describe their most important breakthroughs as creative, intuitive responses to ambiguity, contradiction, and paradox. A unique examination of this less-familiar aspect of mathematics, How Mathematicians Think reveals that mathematics is a profoundly creative activity and not just a body of formalized rules and results. Nonlogical qualities, William Byers shows, play an essential role in mathematics. Ambiguities, contradictions, and paradoxes can arise when ideas developed in different contexts come into contact. Uncertainties and conflicts do not impede but rather spur the development of mathematics. Creativity often means bringing apparently incompatible perspectives together as complementary aspects of a new, more subtle theory. The secret of mathematics is not to be found only in its logical structure. The creative dimensions of mathematical work have great implications for our notions of mathematical and scientific truth, and How Mathematicians Think provides a novel approach to many fundamental questions. Is mathematics objectively true? Is it discovered or invented? And is there such a thing as a "final" scientific theory? Ultimately, How Mathematicians Think shows that the nature of mathematical thinking can teach us a great deal about the human condition itself.