The Man Who Knew Too Much: Alan Turing and the Invention of the Computer (Great Discoveries)

The Man Who Knew Too Much: Alan Turing and the Invention of the Computer (Great Discoveries)
  • Author : David Leavitt
  • Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
  • Pages : 336
  • Relase : 2006-11-17
  • ISBN : 9780393346572

The Man Who Knew Too Much: Alan Turing and the Invention of the Computer (Great Discoveries) Book Review:

A "skillful and literate" (New York Times Book Review) biography of the persecuted genius who helped create the modern computer. To solve one of the great mathematical problems of his day, Alan Turing proposed an imaginary computer. Then, attempting to break a Nazi code during World War II, he successfully designed and built one, thus ensuring the Allied victory. Turing became a champion of artificial intelligence, but his work was cut short. As an openly gay man at a time when homosexuality was illegal in England, he was convicted and forced to undergo a humiliating "treatment" that may have led to his suicide. With a novelist's sensitivity, David Leavitt portrays Turing in all his humanity—his eccentricities, his brilliance, his fatal candor—and elegantly explains his work and its implications.

The Man who Knew Too Much

The Man who Knew Too Much
  • Author : David Leavitt
  • Publisher : Orion
  • Pages : 336
  • Relase : 2007
  • ISBN : 0753822008

The Man who Knew Too Much Book Review:

To solve one of the great mathematical problems of his day, Alan Turing proposed an imaginary programmable calculating machine. But the idea of actually producing a "Turing machine" did not crystallize until he and his brilliant Bletchley Park colleagues built devices to crack the Nazis' Enigma code, thus ensuring the Allies' victory in World War II. In so doing, Turing became a champion of artificial intelligence, formulating the famous (and still unbeaten) Turing Test that challenges our ideas of human consciousness. But Turing's postwar computer-building was cut short when, as an openly gay man in a time when homosexuality was officially illegal in England, he was apprehended by the authorities and sentenced to a "treatment" that amounted to chemical castration, leading to his suicide. With a novelist's sensitivity, David Leavitt portrays Turing in all his humanity-his eccentricities, his brilliance, his fatal candor-while elegantly explaining his work and its implications

The Man Who Knew Too Much Illustrated

The Man Who Knew Too Much Illustrated
  • Author : G K Chesterton
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 206
  • Relase : 2021-06-04
  • ISBN : 9798514869787

The Man Who Knew Too Much Illustrated Book Review:

The Man Who Knew Too Much and other stories (1922) is a book of detective stories by English writer G. K. Chesterton, published in 1922 by Cassell and Company in the United Kingdom, and Harper Brothers in the United States.[1][2][3][4] The book contains eight connected short stories about "The Man Who Knew Too Much", and additional unconnected stories featuring separate heroes/detectives. The United States edition contained one of these additional stories: "The Trees of Pride", while the United Kingdom edition contained "Trees of Pride" and three more, shorter stories: "The Garden of Smoke", "The Five of Swords" and "The Tower of Treason".

Public Library Catalog

Public Library Catalog
  • Author : Anonim
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 268
  • Relase : 2004
  • ISBN : UOM:39015079610690

Public Library Catalog Book Review:

Scientific American

Scientific American
  • Author : Anonim
  • Publisher :
  • Pages :
  • Relase : 2005
  • ISBN : UCSD:31822018121079

Scientific American Book Review:

The Spectator

The Spectator
  • Author : Anonim
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 632
  • Relase : 2006
  • ISBN : UCR:31210016206763

The Spectator Book Review:

Australian Journal of Chemistry

Australian Journal of Chemistry
  • Author : Anonim
  • Publisher :
  • Pages :
  • Relase : 2007
  • ISBN : UOM:39015072614921

Australian Journal of Chemistry Book Review:

The Science Game

The Science Game
  • Author : Neil McK. Agnew,Sandra W. Pyke
  • Publisher : Don Mills, Ont. : Oxford University Press
  • Pages : 532
  • Relase : 2007
  • ISBN : UVA:X030101711

The Science Game Book Review:

Draws an analogy betweens science and a news service: how scientific researchers/reporters collect, check and analyse messages in order to draw conclusions. This book helps students to identify sources of variance in a report and to reveal how the preferences of editors/theorists shape which questions are asked and which interpretations are given.

The New York Times Index

The New York Times Index
  • Author : Anonim
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 2094
  • Relase : 2005
  • ISBN : UCD:31175032142823

The New York Times Index Book Review:

The Indian Clerk

The Indian Clerk
  • Author : David Leavitt
  • Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing USA
  • Pages : 496
  • Relase : 2010-08-10
  • ISBN : 1596918403

The Indian Clerk Book Review:

Based on the remarkable true story of G. H. Hardy and Srinivasa Ramanujan, and populated with such luminaries such as D. H. Lawrence, Bertrand Russell, and Ludwig Wittgenstein, The Indian Clerk takes this extraordinary slice of history and transforms it into an emotional and spellbinding story about the fragility of human connection and our need to find order in the world. A literary masterpiece, it appeared on four bestseller lists, including the Los Angeles Times, and received dazzling reviews from every major publication in the country.

Choice

Choice
  • Author : Anonim
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 690
  • Relase : 2006
  • ISBN : UOM:39015066043368

Choice Book Review:

The Book Review Digest

The Book Review Digest
  • Author : Anonim
  • Publisher :
  • Pages :
  • Relase : 2005
  • ISBN : UOM:39015064843611

The Book Review Digest Book Review:

Alan Turing: The Enigma

Alan Turing: The Enigma
  • Author : Andrew Hodges
  • Publisher : Princeton University Press
  • Pages : 768
  • Relase : 2014-11-10
  • ISBN : 9780691164724

Alan Turing: The Enigma Book Review:

A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The official book behind the Academy Award-winning film The Imitation Game, starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley It is only a slight exaggeration to say that the British mathematician Alan Turing (1912-1954) saved the Allies from the Nazis, invented the computer and artificial intelligence, and anticipated gay liberation by decades--all before his suicide at age forty-one. This New York Times–bestselling biography of the founder of computer science, with a new preface by the author that addresses Turing's royal pardon in 2013, is the definitive account of an extraordinary mind and life. Capturing both the inner and outer drama of Turing’s life, Andrew Hodges tells how Turing’s revolutionary idea of 1936--the concept of a universal machine--laid the foundation for the modern computer and how Turing brought the idea to practical realization in 1945 with his electronic design. The book also tells how this work was directly related to Turing’s leading role in breaking the German Enigma ciphers during World War II, a scientific triumph that was critical to Allied victory in the Atlantic. At the same time, this is the tragic account of a man who, despite his wartime service, was eventually arrested, stripped of his security clearance, and forced to undergo a humiliating treatment program--all for trying to live honestly in a society that defined homosexuality as a crime. The inspiration for a major motion picture starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley, Alan Turing: The Enigma is a gripping story of mathematics, computers, cryptography, and homosexual persecution.

The Essential Turing

The Essential Turing
  • Author : B. Jack. Copeland
  • Publisher : Clarendon Press
  • Pages : 620
  • Relase : 2004-09-09
  • ISBN : 9780191606861

The Essential Turing Book Review:

Alan Turing, pioneer of computing and WWII codebreaker, is one of the most important and influential thinkers of the twentieth century. In this volume for the first time his key writings are made available to a broad, non-specialist readership. They make fascinating reading both in their own right and for their historic significance: contemporary computational theory, cognitive science, artificial intelligence, and artificial life all spring from this ground-breaking work, which is also rich in philosophical and logical insight. An introduction by leading Turing expert Jack Copeland provides the background and guides the reader through the selection. About Alan Turing Alan Turing FRS OBE, (1912-1954) studied mathematics at King's College, Cambridge. He was elected a Fellow of King's in March 1935, at the age of only 22. In the same year he invented the abstract computing machines - now known simply as Turing machines - on which all subsequent stored-program digital computers are modelled. During 1936-1938 Turing continued his studies, now at Princeton University. He completed a PhD in mathematical logic, analysing the notion of 'intuition' in mathematics and introducing the idea of oracular computation, now fundamental in mathematical recursion theory. An 'oracle' is an abstract device able to solve mathematical problems too difficult for the universal Turing machine. In the summer of 1938 Turing returned to his Fellowship at King's. When WWII started in 1939 he joined the wartime headquarters of the Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS) at Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire. Building on earlier work by Polish cryptanalysts, Turing contributed crucially to the design of electro-mechanical machines ('bombes') used to decipher Enigma, the code by means of which the German armed forces sought to protect their radio communications. Turing's work on the version of Enigma used by the German navy was vital to the battle for supremacy in the North Atlantic. He also contributed to the attack on the cyphers known as 'Fish'. Based on binary teleprinter code, Fish was used during the latter part of the war in preference to morse-based Enigma for the encryption of high-level signals, for example messages from Hitler and other members of the German High Command. It is estimated that the work of GC&CS shortened the war in Europe by at least two years. Turing received the Order of the British Empire for the part he played. In 1945, the war over, Turing was recruited to the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in London, his brief to design and develop an electronic computer - a concrete form of the universal Turing machine. Turing's report setting out his design for the Automatic Computing Engine (ACE) was the first relatively complete specification of an electronic stored-program general-purpose digital computer. Delays beyond Turing's control resulted in NPL's losing the race to build the world's first working electronic stored-program digital computer - an honour that went to the Royal Society Computing Machine Laboratory at Manchester University, in June 1948. Discouraged by the delays at NPL, Turing took up the Deputy Directorship of the Royal Society Computing Machine Laboratory in that year. Turing was a founding father of modern cognitive science and a leading early exponent of the hypothesis that the human brain is in large part a digital computing machine, theorising that the cortex at birth is an 'unorganised machine' which through 'training' becomes organised 'into a universal machine or something like it'. He also pioneered Artificial Intelligence. Turing spent the rest of his short career at Manchester University, being appointed to a specially created Readership in the Theory of Computing in May 1953. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of London in March 1951 (a high honour).

International Who's who of Authors and Writers

International Who's who of Authors and Writers
  • Author : Anonim
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 840
  • Relase : 2008
  • ISBN : UOM:49015003128098

International Who's who of Authors and Writers Book Review:

The Annotated Turing

The Annotated Turing
  • Author : Charles Petzold
  • Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
  • Pages : 388
  • Relase : 2008-06-16
  • ISBN : 9780470229057

The Annotated Turing Book Review:

Programming Legend Charles Petzold unlocks the secrets of the extraordinary and prescient 1936 paper by Alan M. Turing Mathematician Alan Turing invented an imaginary computer known as the Turing Machine; in an age before computers, he explored the concept of what it meant to be computable, creating the field of computability theory in the process, a foundation of present-day computer programming. The book expands Turing’s original 36-page paper with additional background chapters and extensive annotations; the author elaborates on and clarifies many of Turing’s statements, making the original difficult-to-read document accessible to present day programmers, computer science majors, math geeks, and others. Interwoven into the narrative are the highlights of Turing’s own life: his years at Cambridge and Princeton, his secret work in cryptanalysis during World War II, his involvement in seminal computer projects, his speculations about artificial intelligence, his arrest and prosecution for the crime of "gross indecency," and his early death by apparent suicide at the age of 41.

Turing's Cathedral

Turing's Cathedral
  • Author : George Dyson
  • Publisher : Pantheon
  • Pages : 452
  • Relase : 2012
  • ISBN : 9780375422775

Turing's Cathedral Book Review:

Documents the innovations of a group of eccentric geniuses who developed computer code in the mid-20th century as part of mathematician Alan Turin's theoretical universal machine idea, exploring how their ideas led to such developments as digital television, modern genetics and the hydrogen bomb.

The Girl Who Knew Too Much

The Girl Who Knew Too Much
  • Author : Amanda Quick
  • Publisher : Penguin
  • Pages : 368
  • Relase : 2017-05-09
  • ISBN : 9780698193628

The Girl Who Knew Too Much Book Review:

In 1930s California, glamour and seduction spawn a multitude of sins in this New York Times bestseller from the author of Tightrope. At the exclusive Burning Cove Hotel on the coast of California, rookie reporter Irene Glasson finds herself staring down at a beautiful actress at the bottom of a pool.... The dead woman had something Irene wanted: a red-hot secret about an up-and-coming leading man—a scoop that may have gotten her killed. As Irene searches for the truth about the drowning, she’s drawn to a master of deception. Once a world-famous magician whose career was mysteriously cut short, Oliver Ward is now the owner of the Burning Cove Hotel. He can’t let scandal threaten his livelihood, even if it means trusting Irene, a woman who seems to have appeared in Los Angeles out of nowhere four months ago. With Oliver’s help, Irene soon learns that the glamorous paradise of Burning Cove hides dark and dangerous secrets. And that the past—always just out of sight—could drag them both under....

Obsessive Genius

Obsessive Genius
  • Author : Barbara Goldsmith
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 257
  • Relase : 2008-05-29
  • ISBN : 1435293843

Obsessive Genius Book Review:

Draws on diaries, letters, and family interviews to discuss the lesser-known achievements and scientific insights of the Nobel Prize-winning scientist, documenting how she was compromised by the prejudices of a male-dominated society.

The Information

The Information
  • Author : James Gleick
  • Publisher : Vintage
  • Pages : 544
  • Relase : 2011-03-01
  • ISBN : 9780307379573

The Information Book Review:

From the bestselling author of the acclaimed Chaos and Genius comes a thoughtful and provocative exploration of the big ideas of the modern era: Information, communication, and information theory. Acclaimed science writer James Gleick presents an eye-opening vision of how our relationship to information has transformed the very nature of human consciousness. A fascinating intellectual journey through the history of communication and information, from the language of Africa’s talking drums to the invention of written alphabets; from the electronic transmission of code to the origins of information theory, into the new information age and the current deluge of news, tweets, images, and blogs. Along the way, Gleick profiles key innovators, including Charles Babbage, Ada Lovelace, Samuel Morse, and Claude Shannon, and reveals how our understanding of information is transforming not only how we look at the world, but how we live. A New York Times Notable Book A Los Angeles Times and Cleveland Plain Dealer Best Book of the Year Winner of the PEN/E. O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award