The Encyclopedia of New York

The Encyclopedia of New York
  • Author : The Editors of New York Magazine
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Pages : 368
  • Relase : 2020-10-20
  • ISBN : 9781501166969

The Encyclopedia of New York Book Review:

The must-have guide to pop culture, history, and world-changing ideas that started in New York City, from the magazine at the center of it all. Since its founding in 1624, New York City has been a place that creates things. What began as a trading post for beaver pelts soon transformed into a hub of technological, social, and cultural innovation—but beyond fostering literal inventions like the elevator (inside Cooper Union in 1853), Q-tips (by Polish immigrant Leo Gerstenzang in 1923), General Tso’s chicken (reimagined for American tastes in the 1970s by one of its Hunanese creators), the singles bar (1965 on the Upper East Side), and Scrabble (1931 in Jackson Heights), the city has given birth to or perfected idioms, forms, and ways of thinking that have changed the world, from Abstract Expressionism to Broadway, baseball to hip-hop, news blogs to neoconservatism to the concept of “downtown.” Those creations and more are all collected in The Encyclopedia of New York, an A-to-Z compendium of unexpected origin stories, hidden histories, and useful guides to the greatest city in the world, compiled by the editors of New York Magazine (a city invention itself, since 1968) and featuring contributions from Rebecca Traister, Jerry Saltz, Frank Rich, Jonathan Chait, Rhonda Garelick, Kathryn VanArendonk, Christopher Bonanos, and more. Here you will find something fascinating and uniquely New York on every page: a history of the city’s skyline, accompanied by a tour guide’s list of the best things about every observation deck; the development of positive thinking and punk music; appreciations of seltzer and alternate-side-of-the-street parking; the oddest object to be found at Ripley’s Believe It or Not!; musical theater next to muckracking and mugging; and the unbelievable revelation that English muffins were created on...West Twentieth Street. Whether you are a lifelong resident, a curious newcomer, or an armchair traveler, this is the guidebook you’ll need, straight from the people who know New York best.

The Encyclopedia of New York State

The Encyclopedia of New York State
  • Author : Peter Eisenstadt
  • Publisher : Syracuse University Press
  • Pages : 1940
  • Relase : 2005-05-19
  • ISBN : 081560808X

The Encyclopedia of New York State Book Review:

The Encyclopedia of New York State is one of the most complete works on the Empire State to be published in a half-century. In nearly 2,000 pages and 4,000 signed entries, this single volume captures the impressive complexity of New York State as a historic crossroads of people and ideas, as a cradle of abolitionism and feminism, and as an apex of modern urban, suburban, and rural life. The Encyclopedia is packed with fascinating details from fields ranging from sociology and geography to history. Did you know that Manhattan's Lower East Side was once the most populated neighborhood in the world, but Hamilton County in the Adirondacks is the least densely populated county east of the Mississippi; New York is the only state to border both the Great Lakes and the Atlantic Ocean; the Erie Canal opened New York City to rich farmland upstate . . . and to the west. Entries by experts chronicle New York's varied areas, politics, and persuasions with a cornucopia of subjects from environmentalism to higher education to railroads, weaving the state's diverse regions and peoples into one idea of New York State. Lavishly illustrated with 500 photographs and figures, 120 maps, and 140 tables, the Encyclopedia is key to understanding the state's past, present, and future. It is a crucial reference for students, teachers, historians, and business people, for New Yorkers of all persuasions, and for anyone interested in finding out more about New York State.

Encyclopedia of the City

Encyclopedia of the City
  • Author : Roger W. Caves
  • Publisher : Taylor & Francis
  • Pages : 564
  • Relase : 2005
  • ISBN : 9780415252256

Encyclopedia of the City Book Review:

The "Encyclopedia of the City" complements Routledge's strong list of readers and textbooks in urban studies and the city. Focusing on the key topics encountered by undergraduates and scholars in urban studies and allied fields, the contributions of its major theoreticians and practitioners, and on other individuals, groups, and organizations which study the city or practice in a field that directly or indirectly affects the city, the "Encyclopedia" necessarily adopts an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary perspective. A first-class work of reference that will be both an essential resource for independent study as well as a useful aid in teaching, this is a solid but also provocative starting point for wider exploration of the ctizenship; city; city beautiful movement; City of Ur; city typologies; civil rights movement; civil society; classicism; closed circuit television

Encyclopedia of New Jersey

Encyclopedia of New Jersey
  • Author : Maxine Lurie,Maxine N. Lurie,Marc Mappen,Michael Siegel
  • Publisher : Rutgers University Press
  • Pages : 927
  • Relase : 2004
  • ISBN : 9780813533254

Encyclopedia of New Jersey Book Review:

Information from New Jersey's earliest history to the present is catalogued in a detailed reference book that covers such topics as architecture, municipalities and counties, business and industry, ethnic groups, and sports and recreation, all enhanced with more than five hundred illustrations and 150 maps.

Gotham

Gotham
  • Author : Edwin G. Burrows,Mike Wallace
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Pages : 1416
  • Relase : 1998-11-19
  • ISBN : 9780199729104

Gotham Book Review:

To European explorers, it was Eden, a paradise of waist-high grasses, towering stands of walnut, maple, chestnut, and oak, and forests that teemed with bears, wolves, raccoons, beavers, otters, and foxes. Today, it is the site of Broadway and Wall Street, the Empire State Building and the Statue of Liberty, and the home of millions of people, who have come from every corner of the nation and the globe. In Gotham, Edwin G. Burrows and Mike Wallace have produced a monumental work of history, one that ranges from the Indian tribes that settled in and around the island of Manna-hata, to the consolidation of the five boroughs into Greater New York in 1898. It is an epic narrative, a story as vast and as varied as the city it chronicles, and it underscores that the history of New York is the story of our nation. Readers will relive the tumultuous early years of New Amsterdam under the Dutch West India Company, Peter Stuyvesant's despotic regime, Indian wars, slave resistance and revolt, the Revolutionary War and the defeat of Washington's army on Brooklyn Heights, the destructive seven years of British occupation, New York as the nation's first capital, the duel between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton, the Erie Canal and the coming of the railroads, the growth of the city as a port and financial center, the infamous draft riots of the Civil War, the great flood of immigrants, the rise of mass entertainment such as vaudeville and Coney Island, the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and the birth of the skyscraper. Here too is a cast of thousands--the rebel Jacob Leisler and the reformer Joanna Bethune; Clement Moore, who saved Greenwich Village from the city's street-grid plan; Herman Melville, who painted disillusioned portraits of city life; and Walt Whitman, who happily celebrated that same life. We meet the rebel Jacob Leisler and the reformer Joanna Bethune; Boss Tweed and his nemesis, cartoonist Thomas Nast; Emma Goldman and Nellie Bly; Jacob Riis and Horace Greeley; police commissioner Theodore Roosevelt; Colonel Waring and his "white angels" (who revolutionized the sanitation department); millionaires John Jacob Astor, Cornelius Vanderbilt, August Belmont, and William Randolph Hearst; and hundreds more who left their mark on this great city. The events and people who crowd these pages guarantee that this is no mere local history. It is in fact a portrait of the heart and soul of America, and a book that will mesmerize everyone interested in the peaks and valleys of American life as found in the greatest city on earth. Gotham is a dazzling read, a fast-paced, brilliant narrative that carries the reader along as it threads hundreds of stories into one great blockbuster of a book.

Savoring Gotham

Savoring Gotham
  • Author : Anonim
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Pages : 760
  • Relase : 2015-11-11
  • ISBN : 9780190263645

Savoring Gotham Book Review:

When it comes to food, there has never been another city quite like New York. The Big Apple--a telling nickname--is the city of 50,000 eateries, of fish wriggling in Chinatown baskets, huge pastrami sandwiches on rye, fizzy egg creams, and frosted black and whites. It is home to possibly the densest concentration of ethnic and regional food establishments in the world, from German and Jewish delis to Greek diners, Brazilian steakhouses, Puerto Rican and Dominican bodegas, halal food carts, Irish pubs, Little Italy, and two Koreatowns (Flushing and Manhattan). This is the city where, if you choose to have Thai for dinner, you might also choose exactly which region of Thailand you wish to dine in. Savoring Gotham weaves the full tapestry of the city's rich gastronomy in nearly 570 accessible, informative A-to-Z entries. Written by nearly 180 of the most notable food experts-most of them New Yorkers--Savoring Gotham addresses the food, people, places, and institutions that have made New York cuisine so wildly diverse and immensely appealing. Reach only a little ways back into the city's ever-changing culinary kaleidoscope and discover automats, the precursor to fast food restaurants, where diners in a hurry dropped nickels into slots to unlock their premade meal of choice. Or travel to the nineteenth century, when oysters cost a few cents and were pulled by the bucketful from the Hudson River. Back then the city was one of the major centers of sugar refining, and of brewing, too--48 breweries once existed in Brooklyn alone, accounting for roughly 10% of all the beer brewed in the United States. Travel further back still and learn of the Native Americans who arrived in the area 5,000 years before New York was New York, and who planted the maize, squash, and beans that European and other settlers to the New World embraced centuries later. Savoring Gotham covers New York's culinary history, but also some of the most recognizable restaurants, eateries, and culinary personalities today. And it delves into more esoteric culinary realities, such as urban farming, beekeeping, the Three Martini Lunch and the Power Lunch, and novels, movies, and paintings that memorably depict Gotham's foodscapes. From hot dog stands to haute cuisine, each borough is represented. A foreword by Brooklyn Brewery Brewmaster Garrett Oliver and an extensive bibliography round out this sweeping new collection.

Highbrow, Lowbrow, Brilliant, Despicable

Highbrow, Lowbrow, Brilliant, Despicable
  • Author : The Editors of New York Magazine
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Pages : 432
  • Relase : 2017-11-07
  • ISBN : 9781501166846

Highbrow, Lowbrow, Brilliant, Despicable Book Review:

New York City: a battered town left for dead, one that almost a million people abandoned and where those who remained had to live behind triple deadbolt locks. It was reinvigorated and became the capital of wealth and innovation, an engine of cultural vibrancy, a magnet for immigrants, and a city of endless possibility. Since its founding in 1968, New York Magazine has told the story of that city's constant morphing, week after week. This book draws from all that coverage to present an enormous, sweeping, idiosyncratic picture of a half-century at the center of the world. It constitutes an unparalleled history of that city's transformation, and of a New York City institution as well.

City on a Grid

City on a Grid
  • Author : Gerard Koeppel
  • Publisher : Da Capo Press
  • Pages : 336
  • Relase : 2015-11-10
  • ISBN : 9780306822858

City on a Grid Book Review:

Winner of the 2015 New York City Book Award The never-before-told story of the grid that ate Manhattan You either love it or hate it, but nothing says New York like the street grid of Manhattan. This is its story. Praise for City on a Grid "The best account to date of the process by which an odd amalgamation of democracy and capitalism got written into New York's physical DNA."--New York Times Book Review "Intriguing...breezy and highly readable."--Wall Street Journal "City on a Grid tells the too little-known tale of how and why Manhattan came to be the waffle-board city we know."--The New Yorker "[An] expert investigation into what made the city special."--Publishers Weekly "A fun, fascinating, and accessible read for those curious enough to delve into the origins of an amazing city."--New York Journal of Books "Koeppel is the very best sort of writer for this sort of history."--Roanoke Times

The Encyclopedia of Sexual Knowledge

The Encyclopedia of Sexual Knowledge
  • Author : A. Costler,A. Willy
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 588
  • Relase : 2013-10
  • ISBN : 1494120240

The Encyclopedia of Sexual Knowledge Book Review:

This is a new release of the original 1940 edition.

Robert Moses and the Modern City

Robert Moses and the Modern City
  • Author : Hilary Ballon
  • Publisher : W. W. Norton
  • Pages : 336
  • Relase : 2007
  • ISBN : 0393732436

Robert Moses and the Modern City Book Review:

A fresh look at the greatest builder in the history of New York City and one of its most controversial figures.

The 99% Invisible City

The 99% Invisible City
  • Author : Roman Mars,Kurt Kohlstedt
  • Publisher : Houghton Mifflin
  • Pages : 400
  • Relase : 2020
  • ISBN : 9780358126607

The 99% Invisible City Book Review:

A beautifully designed guidebook to the unnoticed yet essential elements of our cities, from the creators of the wildly popular 99% Invisible podcast

The Encyclopaedia Britannica

The Encyclopaedia Britannica
  • Author : Anonim
  • Publisher :
  • Pages :
  • Relase : 1911
  • ISBN : UCAL:B2900088

The Encyclopaedia Britannica Book Review:

The Neighborhoods of Brooklyn

The Neighborhoods of Brooklyn
  • Author : Kenneth T. Jackson,John B. Manbeck
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 274
  • Relase : 2004
  • ISBN : 0300103107

The Neighborhoods of Brooklyn Book Review:

Brooklyn—famed for its bridge, its long-departed Dodgers, its Botanic Garden, and its accent—is the most populous borough in New York City and arguably the most colorful. Its many neighborhoods boast diverse and shifting ethnic enclaves, an abundance of architectural styles, and an amazing number of churches and festivals. Generously illustrated with both historical and contemporary photographs, The Neighborhoods of Brooklyn is an indispensable and entertaining guide. Begun as an offshoot of The Encyclopedia of New York City, which provides much of the historical background, the book takes its character from the neighborhoods themselves, as detailed by the Citizens Committee for New York City and Brooklyn Borough Historian John Manbeck. Taking us on a tour of some 90 neighborhoods (including ghost neighborhoods that no longer exist), the book identifies the boundaries of each one through a neighborhood profile and a street map. There is also an essay on each neighborhood as well as an insert with practical tips on subways, buses, libraries, police precincts, fire departments, and hospitals. In addition, each entry includes eclectic neighborhood facts: Erasmus Hall Academy, in Flatbush, boasts such famous graduates as Barbra Streisand and Bobby Fischer; during Poland’s 1990 elections, more than 5,000 absentee ballots were postmarked Greenpoint. The introduction by Kenneth T. Jackson gives an overview of Brooklyn, while an index allows readers to locate key sites within the borough. In 1898, when it was the third largest city in the United States, the City of Brooklyn merged with New York City to become one of its five boroughs. A century later it is time to salute this unique community in a book that will be an essential resource for past, present, and future residents. The Neighborhoods of Brooklyn is the first in a series on New York’s five boroughs.

Empire City

Empire City
  • Author : Kenneth T. Jackson,David S. Dunbar
  • Publisher : Columbia University Press
  • Pages : 994
  • Relase : 2002
  • ISBN : 0231109091

Empire City Book Review:

This major anthology brings together the best literary writing about New York--from O. Henry, Theodore Dreiser, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and John Steinbeck to Paul Auster and James Baldwin.

Encyclopedia of the World's Minorities

Encyclopedia of the World's Minorities
  • Author : Carl Skutsch
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Pages : 1520
  • Relase : 2013-11-07
  • ISBN : 9781135193959

Encyclopedia of the World's Minorities Book Review:

This study of minorities involves the difficult issues of rights, justice, equality, dignity, identity, autonomy, political liberties, and cultural freedoms. The A-Z Encyclopedia presents the facts, arguments, and areas of contention in over 560 entries in a clear, objective manner. For a full list of entries, contributors, and more, visit the Encyclopedia of the World's Minorities website.

The New York Nobody Knows

The New York Nobody Knows
  • Author : William B. Helmreich
  • Publisher : Princeton University Press
  • Pages : 480
  • Relase : 2015-08-25
  • ISBN : 9780691169705

The New York Nobody Knows Book Review:

"As a kid growing up in Manhattan, William Helmreich played a game with his father they called "Last Stop." They would pick a subway line and ride it to its final destination, and explore the neighborhood there. Decades later, Helmreich teaches university courses about New York, and his love for exploring the city is as strong as ever. Putting his feet to the test, he decided that the only way to truly understand New York was to walk virtually every block of all five boroughs--an astonishing 6,000 miles. His epic journey lasted four years and took him to every corner of Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, and Staten Island. Helmreich spoke with hundreds of New Yorkers from every part of the globe and from every walk of life, including Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former mayors Rudolph Giuliani, David Dinkins, and Edward Koch. Their stories and his are the subject of this captivating and highly original book. We meet the Guyanese immigrant who grows beautiful flowers outside his modest Queens residence in order to always remember the homeland he left behind, the Brooklyn-raised grandchild of Italian immigrants who illuminates a window of his brownstone with the family's old neon grocery-store sign, and many, many others. Helmreich draws on firsthand insights to examine essential aspects of urban social life such as ethnicity, gentrification, and the use of space. He finds that to be a New Yorker is to struggle to understand the place and to make a life that is as highly local as it is dynamically cosmopolitan."--Publisher's description.

The Historical Atlas of New York City, Second Edition

The Historical Atlas of New York City, Second Edition
  • Author : Eric Homberger
  • Publisher : Macmillan
  • Pages : 192
  • Relase : 2005-07-01
  • ISBN : 9780805078428

The Historical Atlas of New York City, Second Edition Book Review:

A richly illustrated reference chronicles the history of New York City, from early Native American culture to the present day, capturing the events, inhabitants, neighborhoods, ethnic diversity, and more in a collection of full-color maps, period photographs, drawings, charts, and concise essays. Original. 25,000 first printing.

Subway

Subway
  • Author : John E. Morris
  • Publisher : Black Dog & Leventhal
  • Pages : 264
  • Relase : 2020-10-06
  • ISBN : 9780762467891

Subway Book Review:

This dynamic visual history of the world's largest transit system -- in all its intriguing, colorful, and even seedy glory -- is packed with fascinating facts and hundreds of compelling photographs. When the first New York subway line opened in 1904, it was the most advanced in the world and a source of enormous civic pride. Today, it is an essential function to the lives of New Yorkers and a perennial cultural touchstone. To be a New Yorker is to take the train. To celebrate it, or grumble about it. Subway: The History, Curiosities, and Secrets of the New York City Transit System by John E. Morris is both a vivid history of this great transportation system and an exploration of its impact on the city and popular culture. The book covers every remarkable moment, from the technical obstacles and corruption that impeded plans for an underground rail line in the 1800s, to the current state of the system and plans for the future; profiles of the colorful, forgotten characters who built and restored the subway; graphics and imagery showing the evolution of subway cars and the way fares are collected; how subway etiquette rules have evolved with society; great subway chase scenes and songs about the subway; a look at abandoned stations and half-built tunnels; and more. In this visually stunning work, packed with original research, journalist and bestselling author John Morris brings life to this one-time engineering marvel that has united and expanded the city for the last 116 years.

New York City

New York City
  • Author : George J. Lankevich
  • Publisher : NYU Press
  • Pages : 276
  • Relase : 2002-09
  • ISBN : 0814751865

New York City Book Review:

An exploration into what America was, is, and can become through the lens of the rapidly changing American metropolis From its origins as a primitive Dutch outpost to the sprawling urban complex it is today, the defining characteristic of New York has been constant, dramatic, and rapid change. Formerly published as An American Metropolis, this new edition features a new preface in which Lankevich discusses the impact of the events of September 11 on the city, as well as an updated final chapter on the Giuliani administration. By understanding the history of New York, we obtain a vital sense of what America was, is, and can become.

Crabgrass Frontier

Crabgrass Frontier
  • Author : Kenneth T. Jackson
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Pages : 432
  • Relase : 1987-04-16
  • ISBN : 0199840342

Crabgrass Frontier Book Review:

This first full-scale history of the development of the American suburb examines how "the good life" in America came to be equated with the a home of one's own surrounded by a grassy yard and located far from the urban workplace. Integrating social history with economic and architectural analysis, and taking into account such factors as the availability of cheap land, inexpensive building methods, and rapid transportation, Kenneth Jackson chronicles the phenomenal growth of the American suburb from the middle of the 19th century to the present day. He treats communities in every section of the U.S. and compares American residential patterns with those of Japan and Europe. In conclusion, Jackson offers a controversial prediction: that the future of residential deconcentration will be very different from its past in both the U.S. and Europe.