Reconstruction

Reconstruction
  • Author : Eric Foner
  • Publisher : Peter Smith Pub Incorporated
  • Pages : 690
  • Relase : 2001
  • ISBN : 0844671738

Reconstruction Book Review:

Describes the changes brought about by the Civil War, discusses the impact of slavery's end, and looks at the political, economic, and social aspects of Reconstruction.

Reconstruction Updated Edition

Reconstruction Updated Edition
  • Author : Eric Foner
  • Publisher : Harper Perennial Modern Classics
  • Pages : 752
  • Relase : 2014-12-02
  • ISBN : 0062354515

Reconstruction Updated Edition Book Review:

With a New Introduction From the "preeminent historian of Reconstruction" (New York Times Book Review), a newly updated edition of the prizewinning classic work on the post-Civil War period that shaped modern America Eric Foner's "masterful treatment of one of the most complex periods of American history" (New Republic) redefined how the post–Civil War period was viewed. Reconstruction chronicles the way in which Americans—black and white—responded to the unprecedented changes unleashed by the war and the end of slavery. It addresses the quest of emancipated slaves searching for economic autonomy and equal citizenship, and describes the remodeling of Southern society, the evolution of racial attitudes and patterns of race relations, and the emergence of a national state possessing vastly expanded authority and committed, for a time, to the principle of equal rights for all Americans. This "smart book of enormous strengths" (Boston Globe) remains the standard work on the wrenching post–Civil War period—an era whose legacy still reverberates in the United States today.

An Analysis of Eric Foner's Reconstruction

An Analysis of Eric Foner's Reconstruction
  • Author : Jason Xidias
  • Publisher : CRC Press
  • Pages : 101
  • Relase : 2017-07-05
  • ISBN : 9781351350952

An Analysis of Eric Foner's Reconstruction Book Review:

‘Reconstruction’ is the name given to the period that, beginning shortly before the end of the American Civil War and running until 1877, saw the frustration of federal government's attempts to integrate the newly freed slaves into the American political and economic system. It ended in frustration, disillusionment and also violence, with individual southern states denying rights to freed slaves, preventing them from voting, and largely forcing them back into roles that exploited their labor and prevented them from gaining access to education. For much of the 20th century, the predominant view of the Reconstruction period was that of the Dunning School, which argued that former slaves were unprepared for the responsibilities of voting and holding office, and that it was their incapability of handling such responsibilities – and not the racist actions of whites – that was largely responsible for the failures of the Reconstruction period. Eric Foner's great work reverses those judgements. Foner adopts a problem-solving approach, asking productive questions of state archives and generating and assessing alternative possibilities to assess the views of the Dunning School in a much wider context. His verdict – that slaves and freedmen were often key figures who shaped the eventual emergence of a more progressive American democracy – is backed up by persuasive reasoning which explains how these results came about and shows how the white establishment, led by President Andrew Johnson, was primarily responsible for the disasters of the Reconstruction era.

A Short History of Reconstruction [Updated Edition]

A Short History of Reconstruction [Updated Edition]
  • Author : Eric Foner
  • Publisher : Harper Collins
  • Pages : 320
  • Relase : 2015-01-06
  • ISBN : 9780062384072

A Short History of Reconstruction [Updated Edition] Book Review:

From the “preeminent historian of Reconstruction” (New York Times Book Review), an updated abridged edition of Reconstruction, the prize-winning classic work on the post-Civil War period which shaped modern America. Reconstruction chronicles the way in which Americans—black and white—responded to the unprecedented changes unleashed by the war and the end of slavery. It addresses the quest of emancipated slaves’ searching for economic autonomy and equal citizenship, and describes the remodeling of Southern society; the evolution of racial attitudes and patterns of race relations; and the emergence of a national state possessing vastly expanded authority and one committed, for a time, to the principle of equal rights for all Americans. This “masterful treatment of one of the most complex periods of American history” (New Republic) remains the standard work on the wrenching post-Civil War period—an era whose legacy still reverberates in the United States today.

Reconstruction Updated Edition

Reconstruction Updated Edition
  • Author : Eric Foner
  • Publisher : Harper Collins
  • Pages : 752
  • Relase : 2014-12-02
  • ISBN : 9780062383235

Reconstruction Updated Edition Book Review:

From the "preeminent historian of Reconstruction" (New York Times Book Review), the prize-winning classic work on the post-Civil War period that shaped modern America. Eric Foner's "masterful treatment of one of the most complex periods of American history" (New Republic) redefined how the post-Civil War period was viewed. Reconstruction chronicles the way in which Americans—black and white—responded to the unprecedented changes unleashed by the war and the end of slavery. It addresses the ways in which the emancipated slaves' quest for economic autonomy and equal citizenship shaped the political agenda of Reconstruction; the remodeling of Southern society and the place of planters, merchants, and small farmers within it; the evolution of racial attitudes and patterns of race relations; and the emergence of a national state possessing vastly expanded authority and committed, for a time, to the principle of equal rights for all Americans. This "smart book of enormous strengths" (Boston Globe) remains the standard work on the wrenching post-Civil War period—an era whose legacy still reverberates in the United States today.

Forever Free

Forever Free
  • Author : Eric Foner
  • Publisher : Vintage
  • Pages : 304
  • Relase : 2013-06-26
  • ISBN : 9780307834584

Forever Free Book Review:

From one of our most distinguished historians, a new examination of the vitally important years of Emancipation and Reconstruction during and immediately following the Civil War–a necessary reconsideration that emphasizes the era’s political and cultural meaning for today’s America. In Forever Free, Eric Foner overturns numerous assumptions growing out of the traditional understanding of the period, which is based almost exclusively on white sources and shaped by (often unconscious) racism. He presents the period as a time of determination, especially on the part of recently emancipated black Americans, to put into effect the principles of equal rights and citizenship for all. Drawing on a wide range of long-neglected documents, he places a new emphasis on the centrality of the black experience to an understanding of the era. We see African Americans as active agents in overthrowing slavery, in helping win the Civil War, and–even more actively–in shaping Reconstruction and creating a legacy long obscured and misunderstood. Foner makes clear how, by war’s end, freed slaves in the South built on networks of church and family in order to exercise their right of suffrage as well as gain access to education, land, and employment. He shows us that the birth of the Ku Klux Klan and renewed acts of racial violence were retaliation for the progress made by blacks soon after the war. He refutes lingering misconceptions about Reconstruction, including the attribution of its ills to corrupt African American politicians and “carpetbaggers,” and connects it to the movements for civil rights and racial justice. Joshua Brown’s illustrated commentary on the era’s graphic art and photographs complements the narrative. He offers a unique portrait of how Americans envisioned their world and time. Forever Free is an essential contribution to our understanding of the events that fundamentally reshaped American life after the Civil War–a persuasive reading of history that transforms our sense of the era from a time of failure and despair to a threshold of hope and achievement.

The Second Founding: How the Civil War and Reconstruction Remade the Constitution

The Second Founding: How the Civil War and Reconstruction Remade the Constitution
  • Author : Eric Foner
  • Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
  • Pages : 288
  • Relase : 2019-09-17
  • ISBN : 9780393652581

The Second Founding: How the Civil War and Reconstruction Remade the Constitution Book Review:

From the Pulitzer Prize–winning scholar, a timely history of the constitutional changes that built equality into the nation’s foundation and how those guarantees have been shaken over time. The Declaration of Independence announced equality as an American ideal, but it took the Civil War and the subsequent adoption of three constitutional amendments to establish that ideal as American law. The Reconstruction amendments abolished slavery, guaranteed all persons due process and equal protection of the law, and equipped black men with the right to vote. They established the principle of birthright citizenship and guaranteed the privileges and immunities of all citizens. The federal government, not the states, was charged with enforcement, reversing the priority of the original Constitution and the Bill of Rights. In grafting the principle of equality onto the Constitution, these revolutionary changes marked the second founding of the United States. Eric Foner’s compact, insightful history traces the arc of these pivotal amendments from their dramatic origins in pre–Civil War mass meetings of African-American “colored citizens” and in Republican party politics to their virtual nullification in the late nineteenth century. A series of momentous decisions by the Supreme Court narrowed the rights guaranteed in the amendments, while the states actively undermined them. The Jim Crow system was the result. Again today there are serious political challenges to birthright citizenship, voting rights, due process, and equal protection of the law. Like all great works of history, this one informs our understanding of the present as well as the past: knowledge and vigilance are always necessary to secure our basic rights.

A Short History of Reconstruction, 1863-1877

A Short History of Reconstruction, 1863-1877
  • Author : Eric Foner
  • Publisher : HarperCollins Publishers
  • Pages : 348
  • Relase : 1990
  • ISBN : UOM:39015027271686

A Short History of Reconstruction, 1863-1877 Book Review:

An abridged version of the multiple award-winning Reconstruction: America's unfinished revolution (1988). Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery

The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery
  • Author : Eric Foner
  • Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
  • Pages : 448
  • Relase : 2011-09-26
  • ISBN : 039308082X

The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery Book Review:

“A masterwork [by] the preeminent historian of the Civil War era.”—Boston Globe Selected as a Notable Book of the Year by the New York Times Book Review, this landmark work gives us a definitive account of Lincoln's lifelong engagement with the nation's critical issue: American slavery. A master historian, Eric Foner draws Lincoln and the broader history of the period into perfect balance. We see Lincoln, a pragmatic politician grounded in principle, deftly navigating the dynamic politics of antislavery, secession, and civil war. Lincoln's greatness emerges from his capacity for moral and political growth.

Politics and Ideology in the Age of the Civil War

Politics and Ideology in the Age of the Civil War
  • Author : Eric Foner
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Pages : 256
  • Relase : 1980-10-02
  • ISBN : 9780199727087

Politics and Ideology in the Age of the Civil War Book Review:

Insisting that politics and ideology must remain at the forefront of any examination of nineteenth-century America, Foner reasserts the centrality of the Civil War to the people of that period. The first section of this book deals with the causes of the sectional conflict; the second, with the antislavery movement; and a final group of essays treats land and labor after the war. Taken together, Foner's essays work towards reintegrating the social, political, and intellectual history of the nineteenth century.

Freedom's Unfinished Revolution

Freedom's Unfinished Revolution
  • Author : Willam Friedheim
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 644
  • Relase : 2011-07-12
  • ISBN : 1459623967

Freedom's Unfinished Revolution Book Review:

Written by the same group that produced the award-winning college textbook Who Built America? this is a creative, resourceful attempt to describe the years of the Civil War and Reconstruction for high-school students. The authors have put an unorthodox spin on the Civil War and its aftermath, highlighting ordinary people, both men and women, white and black, and Northerner and Southerner, instead of featuring the usual monotonous list of battles, wars, and generals that most history textbooks provide. In addition, the text asks readers to consider questions addressing racial equality, moral issues, and other 'critical thinking' concerns. Packed with historical documents, photos, letters, engravings, art, political cartoons, speeches, and newspaper excerpts, Freedom's Unfinished Revolution is filled with information that is both captivating and easy tp read, providing a striking, firsthand account of the war and its aftermath.

Reconstruction after the Civil War, Third Edition

Reconstruction after the Civil War, Third Edition
  • Author : John Hope Franklin
  • Publisher : University of Chicago Press
  • Pages : 300
  • Relase : 2012-12-06
  • ISBN : 9780226923390

Reconstruction after the Civil War, Third Edition Book Review:

The classic work of American history by the renowned author of From Slavery to Freedom, with a new introduction by historian Eric Foner. First published in 1961, John Hope Franklin’s revelatory study of the Reconstruction Era is a landmark work of history, exploring the role of former slaves and dispelling longstanding popular myths about corruption and Radical rule. Looking past dubious scholarship that had previously dominated the narrative, Franklin combines astute insight and careful research to provide an accurate, comprehensive portrait of the era. Franklin’s arguments concerning the brevity of the North’s occupation, the limited power wielded by former slaves, the influence of moderate southerners, the flawed constitutions of the radical state governments, and the downfall of Reconstruction remain compelling today. This new edition of Reconstruction after the Civil War also includes a foreword by Eric Foner and a perceptive essay by Michael W. Fitzgerald.

The Great Task Remaining Before Us

The Great Task Remaining Before Us
  • Author : Paul Alan Cimbala,Randall M. Miller
  • Publisher : Fordham Univ Press
  • Pages : 265
  • Relase : 2010
  • ISBN : 9780823232024

The Great Task Remaining Before Us Book Review:

"An unusually strong collection of essays ...the scholarship is impeccable."---Gaines M. Foster, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge --

Who Owns History?

Who Owns History?
  • Author : Eric Foner
  • Publisher : Hill and Wang
  • Pages : 256
  • Relase : 2003-04-16
  • ISBN : 142992392X

Who Owns History? Book Review:

A thought-provoking new book from one of America's finest historians "History," wrote James Baldwin, "does not refer merely, or even principally, to the past. On the contrary, the great force of history comes from the fact that we carry it within us, are unconsciously controlled by it in many ways, and history is literally present in all that we do." Rarely has Baldwin's insight been more forcefully confirmed than during the past few decades. History has become a matter of public controversy, as Americans clash over such things as museum presentations, the flying of the Confederate flag, or reparations for slavery. So whose history is being written? Who owns it? In Who Owns History?, Eric Foner proposes his answer to these and other questions about the historian's relationship to the world of the past and future. He reconsiders his own earlier ideas and those of the pathbreaking Richard Hofstadter. He also examines international changes during the past two decades--globalization, the collapse of the Soviet Union, the end of apartheid in South Africa--and their effects on historical consciousness. He concludes with considerations of the enduring, but often misunderstood, legacies of slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. This is a provocative, even controversial, study of the reasons we care about history--or should.

Tom Paine and Revolutionary America

Tom Paine and Revolutionary America
  • Author : Eric Foner
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press, USA
  • Pages : 378
  • Relase : 2005
  • ISBN : 0195174860

Tom Paine and Revolutionary America Book Review:

'Tom Paine and Revolutionary America' combines a study of the career of the foremost political pamphleteer of the Age of Revolution with a model for the integration of the political, intellectual and social history of the struggle for American independence.

Sick from Freedom

Sick from Freedom
  • Author : Jim Downs
  • Publisher : OUP USA
  • Pages : 279
  • Relase : 2012-05-14
  • ISBN : 9780199758722

Sick from Freedom Book Review:

Sick from Freedom provides the first study of the health conditions of emancipated slaves and reveals the epidemics, illnesses, and poverty that former slaves suffered from when slavery ended and freedom began.

Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men

Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men
  • Author : Eric Foner
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Pages : 400
  • Relase : 1995-04-20
  • ISBN : 0199762260

Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men Book Review:

Since its publication twenty-five years ago, Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men has been recognized as a classic, an indispensable contribution to our understanding of the causes of the American Civil War. A key work in establishing political ideology as a major concern of modern American historians, it remains the only full-scale evaluation of the ideas of the early Republican party. Now with a new introduction, Eric Foner puts his argument into the context of contemporary scholarship, reassessing the concept of free labor in the light of the last twenty-five years of writing on such issues as work, gender, economic change, and political thought. A significant reevaluation of the causes of the Civil War, Foner's study looks beyond the North's opposition to slavery and its emphasis upon preserving the Union to determine the broader grounds of its willingness to undertake a war against the South in 1861. Its search is for those social concepts the North accepted as vital to its way of life, finding these concepts most clearly expressed in the ideology of the growing Republican party in the decade before the war's start. Through a careful analysis of the attitudes of leading factions in the party's formation (northern Whigs, former Democrats, and political abolitionists) Foner is able to show what each contributed to Republican ideology. He also shows how northern ideas of human rights--in particular a man's right to work where and how he wanted, and to accumulate property in his own name--and the goals of American society were implicit in that ideology. This was the ideology that permeated the North in the period directly before the Civil War, led to the election of Abraham Lincoln, and led, almost immediately, to the Civil War itself. At the heart of the controversy over the extension of slavery, he argues, is the issue of whether the northern or southern form of society would take root in the West, whose development would determine the nation's destiny. In his new introductory essay, Foner presents a greatly altered view of the subject. Only entrepreneurs and farmers were actually "free men" in the sense used in the ideology of the period. Actually, by the time the Civil War was initiated, half the workers in the North were wage-earners, not independent workers. And this did not account for women and blacks, who had little freedom in choosing what work they did. He goes onto show that even after the Civil War these guarantees for "free soil, free labor, free men" did not really apply for most Americans, and especially not for blacks. Demonstrating the profoundly successful fusion of value and interest within Republican ideology prior to the Civil War, Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men remains a classic of modern American historical writing. Eloquent and influential, it shows how this ideology provided the moral consensus which allowed the North, for the first time in history, to mobilize an entire society in modern warfare.

Educational Reconstruction

Educational Reconstruction
  • Author : Hilary Green
  • Publisher : Fordham Univ Press
  • Pages : 272
  • Relase : 2016-04-01
  • ISBN : 9780823270132

Educational Reconstruction Book Review:

Tracing the first two decades of state-funded African American schools, Educational Reconstruction addresses the ways in which black Richmonders, black Mobilians, and their white allies created, developed, and sustained a system of African American schools following the Civil War. Hilary Green proposes a new chronology in understanding postwar African American education, examining how urban African Americans demanded quality public schools from their new city and state partners. Revealing the significant gains made after the departure of the Freedmen’s Bureau, this study reevaluates African American higher education in terms of developing a cadre of public school educator-activists and highlights the centrality of urban African American protest in shaping educational decisions and policies in their respective cities and states.

Freedom’s Lawmakers

Freedom’s Lawmakers
  • Author : Eric Foner
  • Publisher : LSU Press
  • Pages : 0
  • Relase : 1996-08-01
  • ISBN : 9780807120828

Freedom’s Lawmakers Book Review:

With Freedom's Lawmakers, Eric Foner has assembled the first comprehensive directory of the over 1,500 African Americans who held political office in the South during the Reconstruction era. He has compiled an impressive amount of information about the antebellum status, occupations, property ownership, and military service of these officials -- who range from U.S. congressmen to local justices of the peace and constables. This revised paperback edition also contains new material on forty-five officials who were not included in the first edition.In his Introduction, Foner ably analyzes and interprets the roles of the black American officeholders. Concise biographies, in alphabetical order, trace the life histories of individuals -- many previously unknown -- who played important parts in the politics of the period. This useful and informative volume also includes an index by state, by occupation, by office during Reconstruction, by birth status, and by topic.

The Wars of Reconstruction

The Wars of Reconstruction
  • Author : Douglas R. Egerton
  • Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing USA
  • Pages : 352
  • Relase : 2014-01-21
  • ISBN : 9781608195749

The Wars of Reconstruction Book Review:

A groundbreaking new history, telling the stories of hundreds of African-American activists and officeholders who risked their lives for equality-in the face of murderous violence-in the years after the Civil War. By 1870, just five years after Confederate surrender and thirteen years after the Dred Scott decision ruled blacks ineligible for citizenship, Congressional action had ended slavery and given the vote to black men. That same year, Hiram Revels and Joseph Hayne Rainey became the first African-American U.S. senator and congressman respectively. In South Carolina, only twenty years after the death of arch-secessionist John C. Calhoun, a black man, Jasper J. Wright, took a seat on the state's Supreme Court. Not even the most optimistic abolitionists thought such milestones would occur in their lifetimes. The brief years of Reconstruction marked the United States' most progressive moment prior to the civil rights movement. Previous histories of Reconstruction have focused on Washington politics. But in this sweeping, prodigiously researched narrative, Douglas Egerton brings a much bigger, even more dramatic story into view, exploring state and local politics and tracing the struggles of some fifteen hundred African-American officeholders, in both the North and South, who fought entrenched white resistance. Tragically, their movement was met by ruthless violence-not just riotous mobs, but also targeted assassination. With stark evidence, Egerton shows that Reconstruction, often cast as a “failure” or a doomed experiment, was rolled back by murderous force. The Wars of Reconstruction is a major and provocative contribution to American history.