North Carolina Slaves and Free Persons of Color

North Carolina Slaves and Free Persons of Color
  • Author : William L. Byrd,John H. Smith
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 197
  • Relase : 2002
  • ISBN : 0788420887

North Carolina Slaves and Free Persons of Color Book Review:

These pages contain a wealth of information transcribed from obscure and fragile, original documents housed at the North Carolina State Archives. Every attempt has been made to transcribe the complete collection, including partial or fragmented documents.

North Carolina's Free People of Color, 1715-1885

North Carolina's Free People of Color, 1715-1885
  • Author : Warren Eugene Milteer Jr.
  • Publisher : LSU Press
  • Pages : 312
  • Relase : 2020-07-01
  • ISBN : 9780807173787

North Carolina's Free People of Color, 1715-1885 Book Review:

In North Carolina’s Free People of Color, 1715–1885, Warren Eugene Milteer Jr. examines the lives of free persons categorized by their communities as “negroes,” “mulattoes,” “mustees,” “Indians,” “mixed-bloods,” or simply “free people of color.” From the colonial period through Reconstruction, lawmakers passed legislation that curbed the rights and privileges of these non-enslaved residents, from prohibiting their testimony against whites to barring them from the ballot box. While such laws suggest that most white North Carolinians desired to limit the freedoms and civil liberties enjoyed by free people of color, Milteer reveals that the two groups often interacted—praying together, working the same land, and occasionally sharing households and starting families. Some free people of color also rose to prominence in their communities, becoming successful businesspeople and winning the respect of their white neighbors. Milteer’s innovative study moves beyond depictions of the American South as a region controlled by a strict racial hierarchy. He contends that although North Carolinians frequently sorted themselves into races imbued with legal and social entitlements—with whites placing themselves above persons of color—those efforts regularly clashed with their concurrent recognition of class, gender, kinship, and occupational distinctions. Whites often determined the position of free nonwhites by designating them as either valuable or expendable members of society. In early North Carolina, free people of color of certain statuses enjoyed access to institutions unavailable even to some whites. Prior to 1835, for instance, some free men of color possessed the right to vote while the law disenfranchised all women, white and nonwhite included. North Carolina’s Free People of Color, 1715–1885 demonstrates that conceptions of race were complex and fluid, defying easy characterization. Despite the reductive labels often assigned to them by whites, free people of color in the state emerged from an array of backgrounds, lived widely varied lives, and created distinct cultures—all of which, Milteer suggests, allowed them to adjust to and counter ever-evolving forms of racial discrimination.

The Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad
  • Author : Colson Whitehead
  • Publisher : Anchor Books
  • Pages : 313
  • Relase : 2018
  • ISBN : 9780345804327

The Underground Railroad Book Review:

#1 New York Times Bestseller - Winner of the Pulitzer Prize - Winner of the National Book Award - Winner of the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction - Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize One of the Best books of the Year: The New York Times, The Washington Post, NPR, The Boston Globe, The Seattle Times, HuffPost, Esquire, Minneapolis Star Tribune Look for Whitehead's acclaimed new novel, The Nickel Boys, available now Cora is a young slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. An outcast even among her fellow Africans, she is on the cusp of womanhood--where greater pain awaits. And so when Caesar, a slave who has recently arrived from Virginia, urges her to join him on the Underground Railroad, she seizes the opportunity and escapes with him. In Colson Whitehead's ingenious conception, the Underground Railroad is no mere metaphor: engineers and conductors operate a secret network of actual tracks and tunnels beneath the Southern soil. Cora embarks on a harrowing flight from one state to the next, encountering, like Gulliver, strange yet familiar iterations of her own world at each stop. As Whitehead brilliantly re-creates the terrors of the antebellum era, he weaves in the saga of our nation, from the brutal abduction of Africans to the unfulfilled promises of the present day. The Underground Railroad is both the gripping tale of one woman's will to escape the horrors of bondage--and a powerful meditation on the history we all share.

Counting Americans

Counting Americans
  • Author : Paul Schor
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Pages : 356
  • Relase : 2017
  • ISBN : 9780199917853

Counting Americans Book Review:

By telling how the US census classified and divided Americans by race and origin from the founding of the United States to World War II, this text shows how public statistics have been used to create an unequal representation of the nation

The Free Negro in North Carolina, 1790-1860

The Free Negro in North Carolina, 1790-1860
  • Author : John Hope Franklin
  • Publisher : Univ of North Carolina Press
  • Pages : 290
  • Relase : 2000-11-09
  • ISBN : 9780807866689

The Free Negro in North Carolina, 1790-1860 Book Review:

John Hope Franklin has devoted his professional life to the study of African Americans. Originally published in 1943 by UNC Press, The Free Negro in North Carolina, 1790-1860 was his first book on the subject. As Franklin shows, freed slaves in the antebellum South did not enjoy the full rights of citizenship. Even in North Carolina, reputedly more liberal than most southern states, discriminatory laws became so harsh that many voluntarily returned to slavery.

North Carolina Slaves and Free Persons of Color

North Carolina Slaves and Free Persons of Color
  • Author : William L. Byrd
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 448
  • Relase : 2006-01-01
  • ISBN : 0788432842

North Carolina Slaves and Free Persons of Color Book Review:

These pages contain a wealth of information transcribed from obscure and fragile, original documents housed at the North Carolina State Archives. Every attempt has been made to transcribe the complete collection, including partial or fragmented documents.

Beyond Slavery's Shadow

Beyond Slavery's Shadow
  • Author : Warren Eugene Milteer Jr.
  • Publisher : UNC Press Books
  • Pages : 376
  • Relase : 2021-09-15
  • ISBN : 9781469664408

Beyond Slavery's Shadow Book Review:

On the eve of the Civil War, most people of color in the United States toiled in bondage. Yet nearly half a million of these individuals, including over 250,000 in the South, were free. In Beyond Slavery's Shadow, Warren Eugene Milteer Jr. draws from a wide array of sources to demonstrate that from the colonial period through the Civil War, the growing influence of white supremacy and proslavery extremism created serious challenges for free persons categorized as "negroes," "mulattoes," "mustees," "Indians," or simply "free people of color" in the South. Segregation, exclusion, disfranchisement, and discriminatory punishment were ingrained in their collective experiences. Nevertheless, in the face of attempts to deny them the most basic privileges and rights, free people of color defended their families and established organizations and businesses. These people were both privileged and victimized, both celebrated and despised, in a region characterized by social inconsistency. Milteer's analysis of the way wealth, gender, and occupation intersected with ideas promoting white supremacy and discrimination reveals a wide range of social interactions and life outcomes for the South's free people of color and helps to explain societal contradictions that continue to appear in the modern United States.

Walker's Appeal, in Four Articles

Walker's Appeal, in Four Articles
  • Author : David Walker
  • Publisher : Univ of North Carolina Press
  • Pages : 80
  • Relase : 2011-09-01
  • ISBN : 9780807869482

Walker's Appeal, in Four Articles Book Review:

First published in 1829, Walker's Appeal called on slaves to rise up and free themselves. The two subsequent versions of his document (including the reprinted 1830 edition published shortly before Walker's death) were increasingly radical. Addressed to the whole world but directed primarily to people of color around the world, the 87-page pamphlet by a free black man born in North Carolina and living in Boston advocates immediate emancipation and slave rebellion. Walker asks the slaves among his readers whether they wouldn't prefer to "be killed than to be a slave to a tyrant." He advises them not to "trifle" if they do rise up, but rather to kill those who would continue to enslave them and their wives and children. Copies of the pamphlet were smuggled by ship in 1830 from Boston to Wilmington, North Carolina, Walker's childhood home, causing panic among whites. In 1830, members of North Carolina's General Assembly had the Appeal in mind as they tightened the state's laws dealing with slaves and free black citizens. The resulting stricter laws led to more policies that repressed African Americans, freed and slave alike. A DOCSOUTH BOOK. This collaboration between UNC Press and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library brings classic works back into print. DocSouth Books editions are selected from the digital library of Documenting the American South and are unaltered from the original publication. The DocSouth series uses digital technology to offer e-books and print-on-demand publications, providing affordable and accessible editions to a new generation of scholars, students, and general readers.

They Behaved Like Soldiers

They Behaved Like Soldiers
  • Author : Michael Cecere
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 135
  • Relase : 2004
  • ISBN : 0788424793

They Behaved Like Soldiers Book Review:

Captain John Chilton's letters and diary offer insight into the more routine aspects of life in the American army during the Revolutionary War, along with detailed observations of his military experiences, the marches, battles, hardships and frustrations.

Black Slaveowners

Black Slaveowners
  • Author : Larry Koger
  • Publisher : McFarland
  • Pages : 300
  • Relase : 1985-12-01
  • ISBN : 9780786469314

Black Slaveowners Book Review:

Most Americans, both black and white, believe that slavery was a system maintained by whites to exploit blacks, but this authoritative study reveals the extent to which African Americans played a significant role as slave masters. Examining South Carolina's diverse population of African-American slaveowners, the book demonstrates that free African Americans widely embraced slavery as a viable economic system and that they--like their white counterparts--exploited the labor of slaves on their farms and in their businesses. Drawing on the federal census, wills, mortgage bills of sale, tax returns, and newspaper advertisements, the author reveals the nature of African-American slaveholding, its complexity, and its rationales. He describes how some African-American slave masters had earned their freedom but how many others--primarily mulattoes born of free parents--were unfamiliar with slavery's dehumanization.

Slavery in Wilkes County, North Carolina

Slavery in Wilkes County, North Carolina
  • Author : Larry J. Griffin
  • Publisher : Arcadia Publishing
  • Pages : 175
  • Relase : 2017
  • ISBN : 9781467135832

Slavery in Wilkes County, North Carolina Book Review:

Slavery is a tragic chapter in the history of Wilkes County with a lasting legacy. Prominent businessmen and celebrated civic leaders, like General William Lenoir and William Pitt Waugh, were among the county's largest slaveholders. Judith Williams Barber endured forty-five years of slavery and garnered respect from both white and black residents. Her story is linked to free person of color and noted landowner Henderson Waugh, whose illustrious, slaveholding white father connected the two families--one slave and the other free. Author Larry Griffin takes readers on an emotional journey to separate fact from myth as he chronicles the history of slavery in Wilkes County. Prominent businessmen and celebrated civic leaders, like General William Lenoir and William Pitt Waugh, were among the county's largest slaveholders. Judith Williams Barber endured forty-five years of slavery and garnered respect from both white and black residents. Her story is linked to free person of color and noted landowner Henderson Waugh, whose illustrious, slaveholding white father connected the two families--one slave and the other free. Author Larry Griffin takes readers on an emotional journey to separate fact from myth as he chronicles the history of slavery in Wilkes County.

Gender and Jim Crow

Gender and Jim Crow
  • Author : Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore
  • Publisher : UNC Press Books
  • Pages : 410
  • Relase : 2013-04-01
  • ISBN : 9781469612454

Gender and Jim Crow Book Review:

Glenda Gilmore recovers the rich nuances of southern political history by placing black women at its center. She explores the pivotal and interconnected roles played by gender and race in North Carolina politics from the period immediately preceding the disfranchisement of black men in 1900 to the time black and white women gained the vote in 1920. Gender and Jim Crow argues that the ideology of white supremacy embodied in the Jim Crow laws of the turn of the century profoundly reordered society and that within this environment, black women crafted an enduring tradition of political activism. According to Gilmore, a generation of educated African American women emerged in the 1890s to become, in effect, diplomats to the white community after the disfranchisement of their husbands, brothers, and fathers. Using the lives of African American women to tell the larger story, Gilmore chronicles black women's political strategies, their feminism, and their efforts to forge political ties with white women. Her analysis highlights the active role played by women of both races in the political process and in the emergence of southern progressivism. In addition, Gilmore illuminates the manipulation of concepts of gender by white supremacists and shows how this rhetoric changed once women, black and white, gained the vote.

New Voyages to Carolina

New Voyages to Carolina
  • Author : Larry E. Tise,Jeffrey J. Crow
  • Publisher : UNC Press Books
  • Pages : 424
  • Relase : 2017-09-14
  • ISBN : 9781469634609

New Voyages to Carolina Book Review:

New Voyages to Carolina offers a bold new approach for understanding and telling North Carolina's history. Recognizing the need for such a fresh approach and reflecting a generation of recent scholarship, eighteen distinguished authors have sculpted a broad, inclusive narrative of the state's evolution over more than four centuries. The volume provides new lenses and provocative possibilities for reimagining the state's past. Transcending traditional markers of wars and elections, the contributors map out a new chronology encompassing geological realities; the unappreciated presence of Indians, blacks, and women; religious and cultural influences; and abiding preferences for industrial development within the limits of "progressive" politics. While challenging traditional story lines, the authors frame a candid tale of the state's development. Contributors: Dorothea V. Ames, East Carolina University Karl E. Campbell, Appalachian State University James C. Cobb, University of Georgia Peter A. Coclanis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Stephen Feeley, McDaniel College Jerry Gershenhorn, North Carolina Central University Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore, Yale University Patrick Huber, Missouri University of Science and Technology Charles F. Irons, Elon University David Moore, Warren Wilson College Michael Leroy Oberg, State University of New York, College at Geneseo Stanley R. Riggs, East Carolina University Richard D. Starnes, Western Carolina University Carole Watterson Troxler, Elon University Bradford J. Wood, Eastern Kentucky University Karin Zipf, East Carolina University

Capitalism and Slavery

Capitalism and Slavery
  • Author : Eric Williams
  • Publisher : Lulu Press, Inc
  • Pages :
  • Relase : 2015-09-17
  • ISBN : 9781329560086

Capitalism and Slavery Book Review:

The present study is an attempt to place in historical perspective the relationship between early capitalism as exemplified by Great Britain, and the Negro slave trade, Negro slavery and the general colonial trade of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. It is strictly an economic study of the role of Negro slavery and the slave trade in providing the capital which financed the Industrial Revolution in England and of mature industrial capitalism in destroying the slave system.

Living Indian Histories

Living Indian Histories
  • Author : Gerald M. Sider
  • Publisher : UNC Press Books
  • Pages : 309
  • Relase : 2003
  • ISBN : 0807855065

Living Indian Histories Book Review:

With more than 40,000 registered members, the Lumbee Indians are the ninth largest tribe in the United States and the largest east of the Mississippi River. Yet, despite the tribe's size, the Lumbee lack full federal recognition and their history has been

Becoming Free, Becoming Black

Becoming Free, Becoming Black
  • Author : Alejandro de la Fuente,Ariela J. Gross
  • Publisher : Cambridge University Press
  • Pages : 320
  • Relase : 2020-01-16
  • ISBN : 9781108480642

Becoming Free, Becoming Black Book Review:

Shows that the law of freedom, not slavery, determined the way that race developed over time in three slave societies.

Southern Slaves in Free State Courts

Southern Slaves in Free State Courts
  • Author : Paul Finkelman
  • Publisher : The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.
  • Pages : 1716
  • Relase : 2007
  • ISBN : 9781584777380

Southern Slaves in Free State Courts Book Review:

Southern Slaves in Free State Courts: The Pamphlet Literature. New York: Garland, 1988. 3 Vols. 1,704 pp. With a New Introduction by Paul Finkelman. Reprinted 2007, 2013 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. Set ISBN-13: 9781584777380. Set ISBN-10:1584777389. Hardcover. New. 34 Pamphlets reprinted in fascimile, in 3 volumes, with a New Introduction by Paul Finkelman: 1. Francis Hargrave. An Argument in the Case of James Sommersett aNegro, Lately Determined by the Court of King's Bench: Wherein it is Attempted to Demonstrate the Present Unlawfulness of Domestic Slavery in England. To Which is Prefixed a State of the Case. London, 1772. 82pp. 2. Edward Long. Candid Reflections Upon the Judgement Lately Awarded by the Court of King's Bench, in Westminster-Hall, on What is Commonly Called the Negro Cause, by a Planter. London, 1772. 76 pp. 3. Britannia Libera, or a Defence of the Free State of Man in England, Against the Claim of Any Man There as a Slave. London, 1772. 47 pp. 4. Samuel Estwick. Considerations on the Negro Cause Commonly so Called, Addressed to the Right Honorable Lord Mansfield. London, 1763. [96] pp. 5. A Letter to Philo Africanus, Upon Slavery; In Answer to His of the 22nd of November, in the General Evening Post, Together With the Opinions of Sir John Strange, and Other Eminent Lawyers Upon This Subject, With the Sentence of Lord Mansfield, in the Case of Somerset and Knowles, 1772, With His Lordship's Explanation of That Opinion in 1786. London, 1788. 40 pp. 6. John Haggard. The Judgment of the Right Hon. Lord Stowell, Respecting the Slavery of the Mongrel Woman, Grace, On An Appeal From The Vice-Admirality Court of Antigua. London, 1827. [50] pp. 7. Considerations on Certain Remarks on the Negro Slavery and Abolition Questions, in Lord Stowell's Judgment in the Case of the Slave "Grace." By a Briton. Newcastle, 1827. 18 pp. 8. Case of the Slave-Child Med. Report of the Arguments of Counsel and of the Opinion of the Court, in the Case of Commonwealth vs. Aves;Tried and Determined in the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts. Boston, 1836. 40 pp. Please contact us for a complete list of titles contained in these three volumes. Originally published as a part of the series Slavery, Race, and the American Legal System, 1700-1872, this set contains facsimiles of 34 rare pamphlets relating to court cases involving the status of slaves in non-slave jurisdictions, including Somerset v. Stewart (1772) and Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857). As in the companion set Fugitive Slaves and American Courts, some pamphlets were part of the public debate over judicial decisions. Others used a case to promote the antislavery cause or, in some instances, support or justify slavery.

Memorial of Citizens of North Carolina to the General Assembly Asking for Certain Reform in the Laws Relating to Slaves and Free Persons of Color

Memorial of Citizens of North Carolina to the General Assembly Asking for Certain Reform in the Laws Relating to Slaves and Free Persons of Color
  • Author : Anonim
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 3
  • Relase : 1840
  • ISBN : OCLC:82443774

Memorial of Citizens of North Carolina to the General Assembly Asking for Certain Reform in the Laws Relating to Slaves and Free Persons of Color Book Review:

African American Genealogical Research

African American Genealogical Research
  • Author : Paul R. Begley
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 24
  • Relase : 1996
  • ISBN : NWU:35556041272907

African American Genealogical Research Book Review:

Slavery's Exiles

Slavery's Exiles
  • Author : Sylviane A. Diouf
  • Publisher : NYU Press
  • Pages : 403
  • Relase : 2016-03-01
  • ISBN : 9780814760284

Slavery's Exiles Book Review:

Over more than two centuries men, women, and children escaped from slavery to make the Southern wilderness their home. They hid in the mountains of Virginia and the low swamps of South Carolina; they stayed in the neighborhood or paddled their way to secluded places; they buried themselves underground or built comfortable settlements. Known as maroons, they lived on their own or set up communities in swamps or other areas where they were not likely to be discovered. Although well-known, feared, celebrated or demonized at the time, the maroons whose stories are the subject of this book have been forgotten, overlooked by academic research that has focused on the Caribbean and Latin America. Who the American maroons were, what led them to choose this way of life over alternatives, what forms of marronage they created, what their individual and collective lives were like, how they organized themselves to survive, and how their particular story fits into the larger narrative of slave resistance are questions that this book seeks to answer. To survive, the American maroons reinvented themselves, defied slave society, enforced their own definition of freedom and dared create their own alternative to what the country had delineated as being black men and women’s proper place. Audacious, self-confident, autonomous, sometimes self-sufficient, always self-governing; their very existence was a repudiation of the basic tenets of slavery.