Little Soldiers

Little Soldiers
  • Author : Lenora Chu
  • Publisher : Harper Paperbacks
  • Pages : 368
  • Relase : 2018-09-18
  • ISBN : 0062367862

Little Soldiers Book Review:

New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice; Real Simple Best of the Month; Library Journal Editors’ Pick In the spirit of Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, Bringing up Bébé, and The Smartest Kids in the World, a hard-hitting exploration of China’s widely acclaimed yet insular education system—held up as a model of academic and behavioral excellence—that raises important questions for the future of American parenting and education. When students in Shanghai rose to the top of international rankings in 2009, Americans feared that they were being "out-educated" by the rising super power. An American journalist of Chinese descent raising a young family in Shanghai, Lenora Chu noticed how well-behaved Chinese children were compared to her boisterous toddler. How did the Chinese create their academic super-achievers? Would their little boy benefit from Chinese school? Chu and her husband decided to enroll three-year-old Rainer in China’s state-run public school system. The results were positive—her son quickly settled down, became fluent in Mandarin, and enjoyed his friends—but she also began to notice troubling new behaviors. Wondering what was happening behind closed classroom doors, she embarked on an exploratory journey, interviewing Chinese parents, teachers and education professors, and following students at all stages of their education. What she discovered is a military-like education system driven by high-stakes testing, with teachers posting rankings in public, using bribes to reward students who comply, and shaming to isolate those who do not. At the same time, she uncovered a years-long desire by government to alleviate its students’ crushing academic burden and make education friendlier for all. The more she learns, the more she wonders: Are Chinese children—and her son—paying too high a price for their obedience and the promise of future academic prowess? Is there a way to appropriate the excellence of the system but dispense with the bad? What, if anything, could Westerners learn from China’s education journey? Chu’s eye-opening investigation challenges our assumptions and asks us to consider the true value and purpose of education.

World Class

World Class
  • Author : Teru Clavel
  • Publisher : Atria Books
  • Pages : 368
  • Relase : 2020-10-06
  • ISBN : 9781501192982

World Class Book Review:

“An upbeat chronicle of [Clavel’s] children’s school experiences in Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Tokyo…[offering] advice about vetting schools and enriching children’s education.” —Kirkus Reviews “An intriguing volume on the differences in global education.” —Library Journal A must-read firsthand exploration of why Asian students are outpacing their American counterparts and how to help our children excel in today’s competitive world. When Teru Clavel had young children, she watched her friends and fellow parents vie for spots in elite New York City schools. Instead of losing herself in the intensive applications and interview process, Teru and her family moved to Asia, embarking on a decade-long journey through the public schools of Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Tokyo. These schools were low-tech and bare-bones, with teachers who demanded obedience and order. In Hong Kong, her children’s school was nicknamed The Prison for its foreboding facilities, yet her three-year-old loved his teachers and his nightly homework. In Tokyo, the students were responsible for school chores, like preparing and serving school lunches. Yet Teru was amazed to discover that her children thrived in these academically competitive cultures; they learned to be independent, self-confident, resilient, and, above all, they developed a deep love of learning. When the family returned to the States, the true culture shock came when the top schools could no longer keep up with her children. Written with warmth and humor, World Class is a compelling story about how to inspire children to thrive academically. “Studded with lists of useful tips about choosing schools and hiring tutors, for parents who must advocate for their children and supplement gaps in their educations” (Publishers Weekly) and an insightful guide to set your children on a path towards lifelong success.

Ballad of the Anarchist Bandits

Ballad of the Anarchist Bandits
  • Author : John Merriman
  • Publisher : Bold Type Books
  • Pages : 336
  • Relase : 2017-10-03
  • ISBN : 9781568589893

Ballad of the Anarchist Bandits Book Review:

The thrilling story of the Bonnot Gang, a band of anarchist bank robbers whose crimes terrorized Belle Époque Paris, and whose escapades reflected the fast-paced, dizzyingly modern, and increasingly violent period on the eve of World War I. For six terrifying months in 1911-1912, the citizens of Paris were gripped by a violent crime streak. A group of bandits went on a rampage throughout the city and its suburbs, robbing banks and wealthy Parisians, killing anyone who got in their way, and always managing to stay one step ahead of the police. But Jules Bonnot and the Bonnot Gang weren't just ordinary criminals; they were anarchists, motivated by the rampant inequality and poverty in Paris. John Merriman tells this story through the eyes of two young, idealistic lovers: Victor Kibaltchiche (later the famed Russian revolutionary and writer Victor Serge) and Rirette Maîtrejean, who chronicled the Bonnot crime spree in the radical newspaper L'Anarchie. While wealthy Parisians frequented restaurants on the Champs-Élysées, attended performances at the magnificent new opera house, and enjoyed the decadence of the so-called Belle Époque, Victor, Rirette, and their friends occupied a vast sprawl of dank apartments, bleak canals, and smoky factories. Victor and Rirette rejected the violence of Bonnot and his cronies, but to the police it made no difference. Victor was imprisoned for years for his anarchist beliefs, Bonnot was hunted down and shot dead, and his fellow bandits were sentenced to death by guillotine or lifelong imprisonment. Fast-paced and gripping, Ballad of the Anarchist Bandits is a tale of idealists and lost causes--and a vivid evocation of Paris in the dizzying years before the horrors of World War I were unleashed.

Fortunate Sons: The 120 Chinese Boys Who Came to America, Went to School, and Revolutionized an Ancient Civilization

Fortunate Sons: The 120 Chinese Boys Who Came to America, Went to School, and Revolutionized an Ancient Civilization
  • Author : Liel Leibovitz,Matthew Miller
  • Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
  • Pages : 336
  • Relase : 2011-02-14
  • ISBN : 9780393080339

Fortunate Sons: The 120 Chinese Boys Who Came to America, Went to School, and Revolutionized an Ancient Civilization Book Review:

"With its surging storyline, extraordinary events, and depth of character, this gripping tale of 120 Chinese boys sent to America…reads more like a novel than an obscure slice of history." —Publishers Weekly, starred review In 1872, China—ravaged by poverty, population growth, and aggressive European armies—sent 120 boys to America to learn the secrets of Western innovation. They studied at New England’s finest schools and were driven by a desire for progress and reform. When anti-Chinese fervor forced them back home, the young men had to overcome a suspicious imperial court and a country deeply resistant to change in technology and culture. Fortunate Sons tells a remarkable story, weaving together the dramas of personal lives with the fascinating tale of a nation’s endeavor to become a world power.

Quotations from Chairman Mao Tsetung

Quotations from Chairman Mao Tsetung
  • Author : Zedong Mao
  • Publisher : China Books
  • Pages : 328
  • Relase : 1990
  • ISBN : 083512388X

Quotations from Chairman Mao Tsetung Book Review:

China's Path to Modernization

China's Path to Modernization
  • Author : Ranbir Vohra
  • Publisher : Pearson College Division
  • Pages : 324
  • Relase : 2000
  • ISBN : STANFORD:36105022148568

China's Path to Modernization Book Review:

Revised and updated, this thoughtful, balanced and highly readable work provides a succinct, yet comprehensive and cohesive overview of China's path to modernization, preparing readers to understand the complex interaction between the Chinese cultural traditional and the internal and external pressures for change that led China onto the path of revolution and Communism. Evaluating the impact of Mao Ze-dong's thought and action on China's development, it explores the nature of Deng Xiao-ping's "second revolution" that reversed many of Maoist policies that put the country on the road to economic prosperity but which also created serious economic and political imbalances that will continue to plague China in the near future. Develops and sustains a narrative line not usually available in survey histories of China, presenting an internal coherence within each chapter that provides not only an integrated picture of political, cultural, and economic developments but also a convenient foundation to grasp the sequence of fundamental changes in China. Provides a brief summary of China's past history, focusing on the ideology and institutions that molded Chinese political culture. Covers critical transition periods, such as the collapse of the Manchu dynasty and the establishment of the first republic; the shift of power from the Nationalists to the Communists; and the rise of Deng Xiao-ping after the passing away of Mao Ze-dong. Expands coverage on many areas, including Tibet, PRC in Taiwan, and Hong Kong; the Sino-Indian war of 1962, and the Sino-Vietnamese war of 1979; plus social, economic, and cultural topics in various periods.

My Life in China and America

My Life in China and America
  • Author : Wing Yung
  • Publisher :
  • Pages : 286
  • Relase : 1909
  • ISBN : STANFORD:36105011974255

My Life in China and America Book Review:

Grenade

Grenade
  • Author : Alan Gratz
  • Publisher : Scholastic UK
  • Pages : 288
  • Relase : 2019-01-03
  • ISBN : 9781407194882

Grenade Book Review:

It's 1945, and the world is in the grip of war. Hideki lives with his family on the island of Okinawa, near Japan. When the Second World War crashes onto his shores, Hideki is drafted to fight for the Japanese army. He is handed a grenade and a set of instructions: Don't come back until you've killed an American soldier. Ray, a young American Marine, has just landed on Okinawa. This is Ray's first-ever battle, and he doesn't know what to expect -- or if he'll make it out alive. All he knows that the enemy is everywhere. Hideki and Ray each fight their way across the island, surviving heart-pounding ambushes and dangerous traps. But then the two of them collide in the middle of the battle... And choices they make in that single instant will change everything. Alan Gratz, New York Times bestselling author of Refugee, returns with this high-octane story of how fear and war tear us apart, but how hope and redemption tie us together. Reviews for Refugee: "An absolute must read for people of all ages" - Hannah Greendale, Goodreads "Like RJ Palacio's Wonder, this book should be mandatory reading..." - Skip, Goodreads "I liked how the book linked history with adventure, and combined to make a realistic storyline for all three characters" - AJH, aged 11, Toppsta

Ruby Bridges and the Desegregation of American Schools

Ruby Bridges and the Desegregation of American Schools
  • Author : Duchess Harris,Tom Head
  • Publisher : ABDO
  • Pages : 51
  • Relase : 2018-12-15
  • ISBN : 9781532170607

Ruby Bridges and the Desegregation of American Schools Book Review:

In 1960, six-year-old Ruby Bridges walked into William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans, Louisiana. She became the first black student to attend the previously all-white school. This event paved the way for widespread school desegregation in the South. Ruby Bridges and the Desegregation of American Schools explores Bridges's legacy. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Core Library is an imprint of Abdo Publishing, a division of ABDO.

Street of Eternal Happiness

Street of Eternal Happiness
  • Author : Rob Schmitz
  • Publisher : Crown
  • Pages : 336
  • Relase : 2016-05-17
  • ISBN : 9780553418095

Street of Eternal Happiness Book Review:

An unforgettable portrait of individuals who hope, struggle, and grow along a single street cutting through the heart of Shanghai, from one of the most acclaimed broadcast journalists reporting on China. Modern Shanghai: a global city in the midst of a renaissance, where dreamers arrive each day to partake in a mad torrent of capital, ideas, and opportunity. Marketplace’s Rob Schmitz is one of them. He immerses himself in his neighborhood, forging deep relationships with ordinary people who see in the city’s sleek skyline a brighter future, and a chance to rewrite their destinies. There’s Zhao, whose path from factory floor to shopkeeper is sidetracked by her desperate measures to ensure a better future for her sons. Down the street lives Auntie Fu, a fervent capitalist forever trying to improve herself with religion and get-rich-quick schemes while keeping her skeptical husband at bay. Up a flight of stairs, musician and café owner CK sets up shop to attract young dreamers like himself, but learns he’s searching for something more. As Schmitz becomes more involved in their lives, he makes surprising discoveries which untangle the complexities of modern China: A mysterious box of letters that serve as a portal to a family’s—and country’s—dark past, and an abandoned neighborhood where fates have been violently altered by unchecked power and greed. A tale of 21st-century China, Street of Eternal Happiness profiles China’s distinct generations through multifaceted characters who illuminate an enlightening, humorous, and at times heartrending journey along the winding road to the Chinese Dream. Each story adds another layer of humanity and texture to modern China, a tapestry also woven with Schmitz’s insight as a foreign correspondent. The result is an intimate and surprising portrait that dispenses with the tired stereotypes of a country we think we know, immersing us instead in the vivid stories of the people who make up one of the world’s most captivating cities.

The Global Classroom

The Global Classroom
  • Author : Lily Jones
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Pages : 456
  • Relase : 2021-01-12
  • ISBN : 9781510753549

The Global Classroom Book Review:

Behind the Scenes of a Revolution in Education In 2013, Cindy Mi, a high school dropout turned English teacher, founded VIPKid with an innovative vision for education: facilitating personalized, one-on-one sessions with students and tutors from around the world. Six years later, her brainchild boasts a multibillion valuation and connects approximately 100,000 teachers and over 700,000 students worldwide. Thisis the story of a revolution in education. The Global Classroom takes readers inside the startup’s history, educational innovation, and unprecedented success. With a foreword from Mi, the book takes a deep dive into a new educational model and investigates how the company’s platform has diversified to serve the needs of students from countries across the globe. Readers will hear from VIPKid’s executives, teachers, students, and parents as they discuss the company’s values, its tangible success, and its impact on their lives. The Global Classroom is an inside look at the model for education in the 21st century and beyond.

The Indian in the Cupboard

The Indian in the Cupboard
  • Author : Lynne Reid Banks
  • Publisher : Doubleday Books for Young Readers
  • Pages : 192
  • Relase : 2010-07-07
  • ISBN : 9780307576248

The Indian in the Cupboard Book Review:

Adventure abounds when a toy comes to life in this classic novel! It's Omri's birthday, but all he gets from his best friend, Patrick, is a little plastic warrior figure. Trying to hide his disappointment, Omri puts his present in a metal cupboard and locks the door with a mysterious skeleton key that once belonged to his great-grandmother. Little does Omri know that by turning the key, he will transform his ordinary plastic toy into a real live man from an altogether different time and place! Omri and the tiny warrior called Little Bear could hardly be more different, yet soon the two forge a very special friendship. Will Omri be able to keep Little Bear without anyone finding out and taking his new friend away?

The Chinese in America

The Chinese in America
  • Author : Iris Chang
  • Publisher : Penguin
  • Pages : 512
  • Relase : 2004-03-30
  • ISBN : 9781101126875

The Chinese in America Book Review:

A quintessiantially American story chronicling Chinese American achievement in the face of institutionalized racism by the New York Times bestselling author of The Rape of Nanking In an epic story that spans 150 years and continues to the present day, Iris Chang tells of a people’s search for a better life—the determination of the Chinese to forge an identity and a destiny in a strange land and, often against great obstacles, to find success. She chronicles the many accomplishments in America of Chinese immigrants and their descendents: building the infrastructure of their adopted country, fighting racist and exclusionary laws and anti-Asian violence, contributing to major scientific and technological advances, expanding the literary canon, and influencing the way we think about racial and ethnic groups. Interweaving political, social, economic, and cultural history, as well as the stories of individuals, Chang offers a bracing view not only of what it means to be Chinese American, but also of what it is to be American.

Chinese Immigrants

Chinese Immigrants
  • Author : Janie Havemeyer
  • Publisher : MOMENTUM
  • Pages : 32
  • Relase : 2019
  • ISBN : 1503827968

Chinese Immigrants Book Review:

Offers readers a compelling look into the lives, challenges, and successes of Chinese immigrants. Additional features include a Fast Facts page, a timeline, informative photo captions, critical-thinking questions, primary source quotes and accompanying source notes, a phonetic glossary, additional resources for further study, and an index.

The Mohave

The Mohave
  • Author : Andrea Palmer
  • Publisher : The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc
  • Pages : 32
  • Relase : 2017-12-15
  • ISBN : 9781538324745

The Mohave Book Review:

For thousands of years, the Mohave's lives have been shaped by the desert in which they live and the Colorado River. They call themselves the Pipa Aha Macav, which means people who live along the water. This book introduces readers to the culture and traditions of the Mohave Indians. Students will enjoy reading about how these skilled farmers and tough warriors have survived for so long in the harsh desert conditions they call home. This important topic in the history of California is covered in detail with age-appropriate text and beautiful, full-color photographs.

The Rape Of Nanking

The Rape Of Nanking
  • Author : Iris Chang
  • Publisher : Basic Books
  • Pages : 360
  • Relase : 2014-03-11
  • ISBN : 9780465028252

The Rape Of Nanking Book Review:

The New York Times bestselling account of one of history's most brutal -- and forgotten -- massacres, when the Japanese army destroyed China's capital city on the eve of World War II In December 1937, one of the most horrific atrocities in the long annals of wartime barbarity occurred. The Japanese army swept into the ancient city of Nanking (what was then the capital of China), and within weeks, more than 300,000 Chinese civilians and soldiers were systematically raped, tortured, and murdered. In this seminal work, Iris Chang, whose own grandparents barely escaped the massacre, tells this history from three perspectives: that of the Japanese soldiers, that of the Chinese, and that of a group of Westerners who refused to abandon the city and created a safety zone, which saved almost 300,000 Chinese. Drawing on extensive interviews with survivors and documents brought to light for the first time, Iris Chang's classic book is the definitive history of this horrifying episode. "Chang vividly, methodically, records what happened, piecing together the abundant eyewitness reports into an undeniable tapestry of horror." - Adam Hochschild, Salon !--[if !supportAnnotations]-- !--[if !supportAnnotations]-- !--[endif]--

China Boy

China Boy
  • Author : Gus Lee
  • Publisher : Penguin
  • Pages : 336
  • Relase : 1994-01-01
  • ISBN : 9781101664742

China Boy Book Review:

“What a knockout. An incredibly rich and new voice or American literature… China Boy grabs the reader’s heart and won’t let go… A wonder of a story.”—Amy Tan, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Joy Luck Club Kai Ting is the only American-born son of a Shanghai family that fled China during Mao’s revolution. Growing up in a San Francisco multicultural, low-income neighborhood, Kai is caught between two worlds—embracing neither the Chinese nor the American way to life. After his mother’s death, Kai is suddenly plunged into American culture by his stepmother, who tries to erase every vestige of China from the household. Warm, funny and deeply moving, China Boy is an account of how a brave friend on the street and a former pro boxing coach equip Kai to navigate through broken family relationships and the perils of growing up in America to find the triumph and richness of developing a new and complex American identity.

America Calling

America Calling
  • Author : Rajika Bhandari
  • Publisher : She Writes Press
  • Pages : 271
  • Relase : 2021-09-14
  • ISBN : 9781647421847

America Calling Book Review:

Growing up in middle-class India, Rajika Bhandari has seen generations of her family look westward, where an American education means status and success. But she resists the lure of America because those who left never return—they all become flies trapped in honey in a land of opportunity. As a young woman, however, she finds herself heading to a US university to study, following her heart and a relationship. When that relationship ends and she fails in her attempt to move back to India as a foreign-educated woman, she returns to the US and finds herself in a job where the personal is political and professional: she is immersed in the lives of international students who come to America from over 200 countries, the universities that attract them, and the tangled web of immigration that a student must navigate. An unflinching and insightful narrative that explores the global appeal of a Made in America education that is a bridge to America’s successful past and to its future, America Calling is both a deeply personal story of Bhandari’s search for her place and voice, and an incisive analysis of America’s relationship with the rest of the world through the most powerful tool of diplomacy: education. At a time of growing nationalism, a turning inward, and fear of the “other,” America Calling is ultimately a call to action to keep America’s borders—and minds—open.

The Woman Warrior

The Woman Warrior
  • Author : Maxine Hong Kingston
  • Publisher : Vintage
  • Pages : 224
  • Relase : 2010-09-01
  • ISBN : 9780307759337

The Woman Warrior Book Review:

NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD WINNER • NATIONAL BESTSELLER • With this book, the acclaimed author created an entirely new form—an exhilarating blend of autobiography and mythology, of world and self, of hot rage and cool analysis. First published in 1976, it has become a classic in its innovative portrayal of multiple and intersecting identities—immigrant, female, Chinese, American. “A classic, for a reason” – Celeste Ng via Twitter As a girl, Kingston lives in two confounding worlds: the California to which her parents have immigrated and the China of her mother’s “talk stories.” The fierce and wily women warriors of her mother’s tales clash jarringly with the harsh reality of female oppression out of which they come. Kingston’s sense of self emerges in the mystifying gaps in these stories, which she learns to fill with stories of her own. A warrior of words, she forges fractured myths and memories into an incandescent whole, achieving a new understanding of her family’s past and her own present.

Mismatch

Mismatch
  • Author : Lensey Namioka
  • Publisher : Delacorte Press
  • Pages : 224
  • Relase : 2007-12-18
  • ISBN : 9780307433565

Mismatch Book Review:

Sue Hua just moved from racially diverse Seattle to a suburban white-bread town where she feels like the only Asian American for miles. Then she meets Andy, a handsome and passionate violin player who happens to be Asian American. Sue feels an instant attraction to Andy, and her white friends think they’re “made for each other”–after all, they both use chopsticks and eat a lot of rice, right? But there’s just one problem. Andy’s last name is Suzuki. And while that may mean nothing to the other students at Lakeview High, Sue knows that it presents a world of problems to her family.